Seat Minimó concept brings a twee electric car to Geneva

first_img See All 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata review: Club life isn’t for everyone, and that’s OK 50 Photos • reading • Seat Minimó concept brings a twee electric car to Geneva Seat Minimó concept is all about urban mobility Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8s Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Post a comment 0 Share your voice 2019 Mazda CX-9 review: Losing its edge? Concept Cars Electric Cars As cars become rolling platforms of technology, we’re starting to see them pop up in odd places. CES is now practically its own auto show, and recently, VW Group’s Spanish division Seat unveiled a concept car at MWC, the world’s biggest phone show, in its hometown Barcelona. But now, it’s made its way to the Geneva Motor Show.To be fair, the Seat Minimó concept is only barely a car. Seat actually refers to it as a quadricycle, taking some aspects of cars and blending them with some aspects of motorcycles. It’s a tiny little guy, with enough space for two people and little else. If you want to bring a passenger and a suitcase, you’ll have to stow the suitcase out back, exposed to the elements.As for the interior, it’s on the minimalist side. The doors are hinged to make it possible for you to get in and out in tight spaces, and the front seat slides forward to offer passenger access. The dashboard is straightforward, with your standard steering wheel and brakes, in addition to a gauge cluster screen that appears to double as an infotainment system.Enlarge ImageIt’s like a Renault Twizy, but way less dorky. Andrew Hoyle/Roadshow That small footprint may not help with hauling, but since this concept is built for urbanites, its tiny dimensions should leave it well suited to handle tight corners and busy streets. It also happens to be electric, which means it’ll be no problem in European city centers that have implemented diesel bans or congestion charges for gas guzzlers. The Minimó concept is designed not to be owned, but to be shared — it’s not something Seat envisions living in your driveway. Instead, it will be out and about all day, lending itself to urbanites in need of a ride. To that end, it’ll keep downtime to a minimum thanks to a hot-swappable battery that slides out from underneath the body. Seat estimates this could reduce car-sharing operation costs by some 50 percent, since there’ll be little if any downtime. Its battery is small, but since everything is small, range clocks in at a decent 62 miles.Other bits of the concept’s tech are also aimed at the mobility market. There’s no physical key — access is found digitally, using a smart device. That same device can bring navigation into the car by way of wireless Android Auto. The concept relies on human drivers, but it could theoretically be outfitted to run autonomously, becoming even more efficient by minimizing the time it spends idle. Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Geneva Motor Show 2019 Tags Geneva Motor Show 2019 Mobile World Congress 2019 More From Roadshow 2019 Audi TT Roadster review: The exit interview Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the USlast_img read more

BNP leader hacked to death

first_imgProthom Alo IllustrationA local leader of the Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) was hacked to death by rivals at Jugirhuda village in Alamdanga upazila of Chuadanga district on Saturday morning, reports UNB.Deceased Helalul Islam Helal, son of a certain Eldil Biswas, was vice president of Khadimpur union BNP of the upazila.Some miscreants attacked Helal around 9:00am while he was working at a field and hacked him indiscriminately, leaving him critically injured, said additional superintendent of police in Chuadanga Kalimullah.He died on the way to hospital, he added.Victim’s wife Razia Khatun alleged that police had arrested their neighbour Manik , who is also a listed drug trader, along with yaba tablets a few days ago. Manik blamed Helal for his arrest and threatened him in several ways.The police official said that two police teams are working to arrest Manik.last_img read more

Two Houston Police Officers Injured In Drunk Driving Incident

first_img Share A suspected drunk driver veered toward two officers, who were responding to a single vehicle accident on the Newcastle ramp off the southwest freeway.Police say one of the officers fell 16 feet off the ramp, to an access road below. The second officer is reported to have also gone over the ledge, holding on to the side of the ramp.Both officers were taken to the hospital, and are expected to be ok.#UPDATE from #HPD after crash involving their officers. #KPRC #Houston @KPRC2 @houstonpolice pic.twitter.com/mjRgZjJ73b— KPRC Cathy Hernandez (@KPRC2Cathy) July 28, 2017 #UPDATE: @houstonpolice say body cam video captured the whole thing and hope it can be released to us soon. @ArtAcevedo pic.twitter.com/q1QzqAu4W4— KPRC Cathy Hernandez (@KPRC2Cathy) July 28, 2017last_img

Coretta Scott King Starts A New Program To Avert Violence

first_imgMay 29, 1982WASHINGTON (UPI) — Coretta Scott King says she is very concerned about high unemployment rates, but feels a new program she is starting across the nation will offer more hope and violence.Mrs. King is president of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for nonviolent Social Change, named after her late husband who preached non-violent protest in the ‘60s.She has initiated a nationwide training program she said is designed to avert violence and give people of all ages hope and belief in themselves.Dorothy Cotton, a prominent civil rights leader who preached nonviolence and worked closely with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., passed away on June 10 at the age of 88. In 1982, the AFRO wrote about the combined efforts of Cotton and Coretta Scott King to reduce violence throughout the United States.“We’re trying to deal with the need that we saw which is the need to provide community trainers in resolving community conflicts,” said Dorothy Cotton, a center vice president and one of the trainers.Mrs. Cotton and Mrs. King discussed their training sessions at a news conference and in a telephone interview.Mrs. Cotton said four day conferences have been held in Oakland, CA, Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis and Washington. She said other training sessions are scheduled for New York City and Atlanta.Between 35 and 40 people attend the Washington training sessions led by Mrs. Cotton and Mrs. King; Bernard Lafayette of Tuskegee, AL, who worked with King in the ‘60s, and the Rev. Leslie Carter, who organized the Work For Peace Academy.The training sessions include lectures, films, discussion and role playing.“The idea is to avert violence and tension and create love of community rather than frustration and ineffective confrontation,” Mrs. Cotton said.Mrs. King said the program was in the planning stages “for a couple of years” and involves “some 22 cities,” with training centers located in seven or eight cities where the “potential for conflict” exists.“We’re hoping that we don’t have disruption on a wide scale,” Mrs. King said. “But if things tend to be moving in that direction, we hope that people in the communities and the channels of communication will be open.”Mrs. King was asked if her concern was intensified by the recent unemployment figures showing the highest unemployment rate in 40 years.“Yes, I am. It certainly does. One wonders what will happen when the people have no jobs, have no place to turn, how they’ll deal with this kind of desperation and frustration,” she said.Mrs. King said it is the “responsibility of every person in the community to be concerned, to do problem-solving, especially in the areas where there are resources, in the private sector.”“I’m very concerned about the high unemployment,” Mrs. King said. “When young people are idle, they turn to destructive ways to use their time. What we’re doing is trying to go help people get involved in the community such as registering people to vote…to help people understand it is important that they get involved.”Mrs. King also said there “has been apathy” in the country. “I think some of it has to do with the fact that people soon forget that you can’t stop, you have to continue to earn your rights” and that is one of the things her training sessions try to accomplish, she said.“Essentially, we’re teaching them an understanding of politics, how you may change public policies, your responsibility to do that,” Mrs. King said. “We have to put people in  office who are concerned about people.”Transcribed by Matthew Ritchielast_img read more

Physicists use BoseEinstein condensates to enhance factoring algorithm

first_img ‘Connecting the dots’ for quantum networks Explore further Recently, some approaches have suggested “rediscovering” old techniques such as analog computing, which usually lie outside the usual qubit architecture, in the hope of finding new pathways to experimentally realize quantum computation. For instance, using analog techniques and the quantum properties of atomic clusters called Bose-Einstein condensates, a team of researchers from Japan has recently improved upon a classical factoring algorithm.“Any algorithm where the output is continuous rather than divided into bits (as on a digital computer) is analog,” Mark Sadgrove of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JSTA) told PhysOrg.com. “In our case, we measure quantities which are continuous in principle. By this I mean that the energy or the probability to find an atom with a given momentum are continuous variables, in theory. In practice, we use a finite number of atoms, so in some sense the final outputs are discrete, but theoretically the result of the computation is analog in nature.”Sadgrove and his colleagues Sanjay Kumar of the University of Electro Communications (UEC) in Chofushi, Chofugaoka, and Ken’ichi Nakagawa, who has affiliations with both JSTA and UEC, have demonstrated that, compared with the classical implementation, their method can distinguish more accurately between factors and non-factors of large numbers. Specifically, their quantum system could increase the accuracy of a classical algorithm called the Gauss sum algorithm, a technique pioneered by Wolfgang Shleich of Ulm University in Germany.Their quantum system consists of thousands of rubidium-87 atoms that are cooled to near absolute zero to form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). At such a low temperature, the atoms’ wavelengths increase and overlap, so that the cluster becomes a single quantum state and obeys quantum laws, yet has a relatively large size. The physicists zapped the BEC with a brief light pulse composed of two counter-propagating beams. They programmed one beam to have phase jumps (to displace the beam’s wavelength), while the second beam had no phase jumps. Programming the first beam served as the input method, representing an integer to be factored. (PhysOrg.com) — Theoretically, quantum computing has the potential to work more efficiently and accurately than classical computing for certain processes, such as factoring. But quantum methods are experimentally challenging, since they often require tiny, fragile systems that are difficult to handle. An absorption image of the expanding Bose-Einstein condensate, demonstrating the diffraction pattern which constitutes the factoring signal. Image credit: Mark Sadgrove, et al.center_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The dynamics of the atoms subject to the pulse could then be used to perform factoring calculations. After applying the pulse, the researchers allowed the BEC to expand freely for 14 ms. They then took an absorption image of the BEC, which showed that the pulse had separated the atoms in the BEC into different momentum orders. The atoms formed a diffraction pattern, based on the relative number of atoms in each momentum order, which the physicists could interpret as the “factoring signal.” Specifically, high-momentum atoms represented factors, and low-momentum atoms represented non-factors.“You can think of the laser beam as containing the software (encoded by phase jumps) and the atoms as providing the hardware (their natural dynamics in response to the light field is what actually calculates the Gauss sum),” Sadgrove explained.In contrast to the usual Gauss sum, which is fundamentally limited in its accuracy, the quantum method significantly outperformed the classical method, in some cases doubling the atomic visibility and offering near-perfect factoring. “In our case, our current method is still slow – it doesn’t make factoring easy,” Sadgrove said. “What we showed is that quantum mechanics offers an unexpected improvement to the Gauss sum method, overcoming a fundamental accuracy limit. If the atoms behaved classically, there would be no enhancement.”The researchers noted that the higher accuracy comes at a cost of requiring more atoms, so the quantum method’s efficiency is about the same as that of the classical method. Nonetheless, as Sadgrove explained, the method offers a novel experiment in a field in which experiments are difficult to realize.“You might know that everyone doing research in quantum information is excited about [Peter] Shor’s algorithm for quantum factoring,” Sadgrove said. “Shor found a remarkable way to factor numbers using the quantum properties of interference and entanglement, which offers amazing savings in the time it takes for factoring a number. But Shor’s algorithm is hard to implement. It’s only been done successfully for up to the number 15 at the moment, and some people don’t even consider that to be a real test due to some details about the way the algorithm works. So that’s the current state of play regarding quantum factoring.”He added that researchers continue to investigate Shor’s algorithm because of its potential impact on security: “In terms of applications, there’s just one, but it’s very important. If you could do real quantum factoring, then the RSA encryption used to do secure transactions in public situations would be no good anymore. That’s because it relies on the fact that factoring large numbers is a hard problem. But quantum factoring makes it easy.”In the future, the physicists hope to use entangled systems as a factoring method, which they say the present scheme is ideally suited for. They also plan to investigate the use of multiple, correlated atomic ensembles to perform factoring of different integers simultaneously. “We would also like to extend the method beyond factoring,” Sadgrove said. “We can actually compute general ‘exponential sums’ with this method. A Gauss sum is a simple example of an exponential sum, as is a Fourier transform, which can be used to extract information about a signal. These so called ‘exponential sums’ are intricately tied to the most interesting parts of number theory, such as the distribution of prime numbers, which is still unknown. We think there may be other powerful applications of exponential sums apart from factoring.”More information: Sadgrove, Mark; Kumar, Sanjay; and Nakagawa, Ken’ichi. “Enhanced Factoring with a Bose-Einstein Condensate.” Physical Review Letters, 101, 180502 (2008).Copyright 2008 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: Physicists use Bose-Einstein condensates to enhance factoring algorithm (2008, November 10) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-11-physicists-bose-einstein-condensates-factoring-algorithm.htmllast_img read more

Six killed as lightning strikes parts of Bengal city likely to witness

first_imgKolkata: Six persons were killed after being struck by lightning in three separate incidents in the districts of Nadia, Bankura and Howrah. The incident took place on Wednesday morning when a thunder shower lashed various South Bengal districts. Lightning struck four persons including two brothers in Nadia leading to their deaths. While in separate incidents of lightning, two persons were killed in Bankura and Howrah each.According to Nadia police, the victims were all working in a field at Noamile in Nadia on Wednesday morning when the thundershowers started. The victims are Kalachand Seikh (60), Kamal Seikh (50), Najizul Seikh (30) and Azizul Seikh (25). Najizul and Azizul were two bothers. In another incident, a 58-year-old Kartin Soren was ploughing in Bankura’s Sarenga when he was struck by lightning. The third incident occurred in Howrah’s Panchla. The victim has been identified as Urmila Mondal (42) who was returning home from field work. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe district administrations took prompt action to restore normalcy following the incidents. There was heavy rainfall in some districts for hours causing water logging. Some of the roads became inundated. Nadia and Murshidabad witnessed a storm accompanied by moderate to heavy rainfall causing inconvenience to the commuters. It started raining from 11 am in some districts. The rain accompanied by storm, however, provided relief to the people in these districts as it brought down the temperatures by a few notches. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedThe sky remained overcast in North 24-Parganas, South 24-Parganas and also in the city in the morning hours. The city also received light rainfall on Wednesday morning.According to the weather office, a cyclonic circulation formed over the state that caused rains in the districts. There is also a possibility of thundershowers in the South Bengal districts during the evening in the next few days, the Met department predicted.It may be mentioned here that rain lashed some parts of North 24-Parganas, South 24-Parganas, Nadia, Hooghly and Kolkata on Wednesday evening. The Regional Meteorological Centre in Alipore predicted that it may rain in the city and adjoining areas, accompanied by storm in the next 24 hours. According to a weather expert, a strong moisture-laden wind which is blowing from the sea, turned the conditions favourable for a storm.last_img read more