400 metres finals push – Cameron urges young stars to step up

first_img URGE FORWARD Bert Cameron, the elder statesman of the 400 metres, is full of praise for the young Jamaicans who currently compete in his pet event. Cameron, the 1983 World 400 metres champion, is also encouraging the likes of 2016 Olympic 4×400 relay silver medal winners Javon Francis and Nathon Allen to excel in the individual event. Speaking before a Cameron Blazers training session earlier this week, the 1984 and 1988 Olympic finalist was looking forward to great days for Francis, Allen and other upcoming Jamaicans in the 400m. “I can’t wait to see the day when the quarter-milers are genuinely back because that’s the only race I really love,” he hoped. “I just want to see those individual runners get to finals,” he said. The last Jamaican male 400m runner to reach a World or Olympic final is Jermaine Gonzales, who raced to a close fourth in the 2011 World Championships. Gonzales, who is making progress after several injury setbacks, was among those hard at work during the ensuing Blazers workout. At the 2016 Olympics, Francis and Rusheen McDonald, national record holder at 43.93 seconds, both reached the semi-final stage, but no further. With Allen blazing a 43.5-second relay leg in the heats and Francis storming a 43.9 anchor in the final, Jamaica took silver in the relay. That earned praise from Cameron. It also led him to urge them all forward. “If you win a silver medal in an open event then you know you’re doing something,” he said. Cameron believes fast running in individual races should spill over into the relay. “And then, if you’re running that fast in the individual races,” he asserted, “then you know that you run faster relays, at least a second faster.” After naming Francis and Allen specifically, he predicted: “I see some good young quarter-milers, so hopefully, we can challenge the United States because remember we’ve won that before.” That comment was a reference to the Jamaican 4x400m victory over the Americans in the 1952 Olympics in London by Arthur Wint, Les Laing, Herb McKenley and George Rhoden. Jamaica also beat the USA to win World Indoor titles in 1991 and 2004. “You know, those days will come back,” said the coach who directed Gonzales to a number 2 world ranking in 2010, Rosemarie Whyte-Robinson to the 2012 Olympic women’s final, and Tiffany James to the World Under-20 gold medal this summer. “I want to live to see that,” he concluded.last_img read more

iTunes pricing issue solved

first_imgThe album price reduction is good for only 180 days after the initial purchase of individual tracks. Eddy Cue, Apple’s vice president of iTunes, said the new feature should help eliminate the resistance that customers, including himself, may have felt in buying an album after they had already bought a single from it. “Once we bought a song, we wondered why we had to buy it again if we wanted the album,” Cue said. “We hope it helps us sell more songs ultimately, and from the customer point of the view, we think it’s the right thing to do.” Customers bought about 45 percent of the nearly 2.5 billion songs sold on iTunes as albums, Cue said. For a limited period of 90 days, Apple said it will make the “Complete My Album” offer retroactive for users who purchased tracks dating back to the launch of the iTunes Store four years ago. Apple dominates the online music market and is a worldwide music retailer behind only Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Best Buy Co. and Target Corp. Some record-label executives have complained about Apple’s one-size-fits-all model of 99 cents a track. They would prefer flexible pricing, such as charging more for new releases. Some also contend today’s easy access to single-song downloads – versus the more lucrative method of selling albums – hasn’t helped the industry’s declining sales. In addition, some artists have complained about how song-at-a-time downloads have wrecked the integrity of albums that are meant to be enjoyed as a single work of art. Apple plans to maintain its groundbreaking 99-cents-per-download model because “it’s exactly what consumers want,” Cue said in an interview. But he also said the concept of “albums should exist forever,” although the concept is being redefined in the digital era. Some albums sold on iTunes, for instance, include music videos. Thomas Hesse, a president of global digital business at Sony BMG Music Entertainment, called “Complete My Album” another “revolutionary” offering from the Cupertino-based company. “ITunes is giving music fans the best of both worlds – the ability to discover great new music by buying just the single and a credit toward the purchase of the complete album,” he said in a written statement.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN JOSE – Apple Inc., the company that popularized selling songs online for 99 cents apiece, now hopes to buoy interest in albums, giving customers credit for purchases of full albums from which they have bought individual tracks. Apple introduced the “Complete My Album” feature Thursday on its iTunes Store. It now gives a full credit of 99 cents for every track the user previously purchased and applies it toward the purchase of the complete album. For instance, most albums on iTunes cost $9.99, so a customer who already bought three tracks can download the rest of the album for $7.02. Previously, users who bought singles ended up with duplicates of those songs if they later opted to buy the album, for which they had to pay the full price. last_img read more