WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB The Best Stories From Wilmingtons Newspapers

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are recent articles about Wilmington — published online between July 14, 2019 to July 21, 2019 — that residents should consider reading:Wilmington Town CrierAnalog Devices updates town on expansion by Lizzie McDermottWilmington accountant Mike Morris retires by Lizzy HillWilmington Town Crier sports stories can be read HERE.Wilmington AdvocateNoneWilmington PatchNoneLowell SunNew top cop in Wilmington by Emma MurphyA tasty summer tradition used to help a good cause by Emma MurphyLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”last_img read more

Asian shares routed as goldilocks trade suddenly unwinds

first_imgA street sign for Wall Street is seen outside the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., December 28, 2016. [Representational Image]Reuters fileAsian shares and US stock futures sank on Tuesday, after Wall Street suffered its biggest decline since 2011 as investors’ faith in factors underpinning a bull run in markets began to crumble.S&P mini futures fell as much as 2.5 percent to nearly four-month lows in Asia, extending their losses from the record peak hit just over a week ago to almost 12 percent.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan slid 3.5 percent to a one-month low, which would be its biggest fall in more than a year and a half, a day after it had fallen 1.6 percent.Japan’s Nikkei tumbled as much as 5.6 percent while Taiwan shares lost 5.3 percent at one point.Australian shares dropped 3 percent to their lowest since October while South Korean shares fell 3 percent.The rout came after US stocks plunged in highly volatile trading on Monday, with the Dow industrials falling nearly 1,600 points during the session, its biggest intraday decline in history, as investors grappled with rising bond yields and potentially higher inflation.”The amount of the sell-off that we are seeing is normal. The speed at which we are doing it is not normal,” said Michael Purves, chief global strategist at Weeden & Co in New York.”Where does the market rout end? I think we are pretty close to a selling climax here. I think we are pretty close. The fundamentals are pretty good. The only thing that is really different is that bond yields got up to 2.8 percent.”The benchmark S&P 500 slumped 4.1 percent and the Dow 4.6 percent, suffering their biggest percentage drops since August 2011 as a long-awaited pullback from record highs deepened.Before Monday’s fall, the index had not seen a pullback of more than 5 percent for more than 400 sessions, which analysts said was the longest such streak in history.”Since last autumn, investors had been betting on the goldilocks economy — solid economic expansion, improving corporate earnings and stable inflation. But the tide seems to have changed,” said Norihiro Fujito, senior investment strategist at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities.The trigger for the sell-off was a sharp rise in U.S. bond yields following Friday’s data that showed U.S. wages increasing at the fastest pace since 2009, raising the alarm about higher inflation and with it potentially higher interest rates.The 10-year US Treasuries yield rose to as high as 2.885 percent on Monday, its highest in four years and 47 basis points above the 2.411 percent seen at the end of 2017.But a massive fall in share prices prompted an about-turn, and in Asian trade on Tuesday, it fell back to as low as 2.685 percent.Fed fund futures are now pricing in only two rate hikes this year.The CBOE Volatility index, the closely followed “fear-index” measure of expected near-term stock market volatility jumped 20 points to 30.71, its highest since August 2015.”For the last several months, whether it’s stocks or commodities, risk-takers had been the winners. And that’s what hedge funds, which now manage $3.2 trillion, have been doing,” Mitsubishi UFJ’s Fujito said.”Their leveraged position is now being unwound. And it seems as though there are still some people who haven’t run away (from the sell-off) yet. I would expect more instability,” he added.European shares also tumbled on Monday, with Germany’s Dax hitting a 4-month low.Yoshinori Shigemi, market strategist at JPMorgan Asset Management, said the specter of inflation will gradually undermine the attraction of equities even though the markets could rebound in the short term. A view of the exterior of the Nasdaq market site in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S., October 24, 2016. [Representational Image]Reuters file”In the end, the Fed will have to hike rates. And if it doesn’t, long-dated bonds will be sold off on worries about inflation. Either way, that is going to slow down the economy. Rising wages also mean corporate profit margins will be squeezed gradually down the road,” he said.Keen to avoid further risk, investors are closing their positions in other assets, including the currency market where a popular strategy has been to sell the dollar against the euro and other currencies seen as benefiting from higher interest rates in the future.The euro eased to $1.2358, not far from last week’s low of $1.2335, a break of which could usher in a further correction after its rally to a 3-year high of $1.2538 by late last month.Against the yen, which is often used as a safe-haven currency because of Japan’s solid current account surplus, the dollar slipped 0.3 percent to 108.69 yen, after having lost one percent on Monday.Bitcoin was not spared from selling, hitting a 12-week low of $6,400. That represented a 67.5 percent fall from its record high of $19,666, touched on Dec. 17.Investors also dumped junk bonds, with the yield of Merrill Lynch U.S. high yield index rising to 6.017 percent from 5.964 percent at the end of last week.Still, it was far below its 2016 peak just above 10 percent, when low oil prices hurt energy firms.Oil prices also dropped, with international benchmark Brent futures hitting a one-month low of $66.90 per barrel on Monday. It last stood at $67.02.US crude futures traded at $63.56 per barrel, down 0.8 percent in Asia.last_img read more

Drunk Bats Manage To Pass Sobriety Tests

first_imgA Pallas’s long-tongued bat, representing one of six species used in the new study. Bat researchers from the biology departments of the University of Western Ontario and the University of Regina (Saskatchewan, Ca) theorized that the amount of ethanol in the fermented fruit and nectars that the bats ingested was likely to induce intoxication.The researchers gave “sobriety tests” to 106 bats, representing six species of New World Leaf-nosed bats, after the bats had consumed enough ethanol to bring their blood alcohol content (BAC) up to 0.3 or higher. (The legal limit of BAC for human drivers is .08!) The bat BAC levels were attained by feeding the test bats ethanol mixed with sugar water. Their control group counterparts received just the plain sugar water.The bats took flight in a researcher-constructed obstacle course in which the bats would have to navigate according to five standard identifiable flying behaviors of phyllostomide bats. Otherwise, they would betray their drunkenness. Additionally, the biologists expected the alcohol to alter the bats’ echolation, or calling behavior, so they recorded the bats with ultrasonic condenser microphones.”We went into the study fully expecting that some of the species wouldn’t be able to hold their drink,” study co-author Brock Fenton, from the University of Western Ontario, told National Geographic News.But once the bats went through the test – some, mind you, with three times higher BAC than a drunk driver – the researchers found no measurable change in either flight or calling behaviors. A prior study conducted with Old World bats dieting on seasonal fruit and nectar reported signs that bat motor skills and echolation were clearly affected by the ethanol content in their diets. Apparently, the New World bats, exposed to high-ethanol products all year round, have developed an alcohol tolerance that has “afforded them an evolutionary edge.” Fenton and his colleagues are now trying “to find a company that sells alcoholic refreshments who will sponsor an expanded study.” (PhysOrg.com) — New World Leaf-nosed bats (Chiroptera Phyllostomidae) are thriving in the tropical forests of Central and South America, even though their diets consist of more fruits and nectars than their counterparts in the Old World. Strange thing is the phyllostomide bats are drawn to fruits and nectars even after they have fermented. More information: Drinking and Flying: Does Alcohol Consumption Affect the Flight and Echolocation Performance of Phyllostomid Bats? Citation: Orbach DN, Veselka N, Dzal Y, Lazure L, Fenton MB (2010) Drinking and Flying: Does Alcohol Consumption Affect the Flight and Echolocation Performance of Phyllostomid Bats? PLoS ONE 5(2): e8993. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008993 Study looks at metal baseball bat safety © 2010 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Drunk Bats Manage To Pass Sobriety Tests (2010, February 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-02-drunk-sobriety.htmllast_img read more

Undaunted Even 1 lakh FIRs wont slow our fight says Mamata

first_imgKolkata: Stating that the country is experiencing a state of “super emergency”, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has assured that her fight of justice for the people will continue, even if lakhs of FIRs are lodged against her and her party colleagues.While reacting on the FIR lodged against her and the arrest of her party’s MPs, MLA and minister at Silchar, the Chief Minister said: “They keep lodging FIRs against us. It is interesting that I am sitting in Bengal and an FIR has been lodged in Assam…we don’t mind even if 1 lakh FIRs are lodged against us for fighting for the rights of common people.” Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeBanerjee said that she has spoken to the Union Home minister Rajnath Singh during her visit to Delhi and the latter has assured her that there will be no harassment of common people. “My question is that then why have our MPs been harassed today?” she asked.She maintained in the same breath: “We are actually in a situation of super-emergency. There is no democracy in the country.”Condemning the arrest of her party colleagues, the Chief Minister said: “They went there for a better cause. My question is that if everything is normal and peaceful in Assam, then why has section 144 of CrPC been imposed in all the districts? Why were they (TMC MPs, MLA and minister) stopped when two of them wanted to go ahead at a time instead of marching together in a group? They just wanted to go to the convention centre and return after speaking to some people there.” “Our fight will continue for the sake of common people. We will never step back,” she added.She further added that there is no democratic right in the country. “Senior journalists are being beaten up,” she said, adding that the Army personnel from Assam, who are deployed in borders, are also worried about their family members.last_img read more

Learning value of money may make kids less philanthropic

first_imgEven if your five-year-old kid does not know what money can buy for him or her, the moment he or she gets to know the value of it, chances are the knowledge may make him or her less philanthropic in nature, says an interesting research.In other words, the act of handling money makes young children work harder and give less. This effect was observed in children who lacked the concrete knowledge of money’s purpose and persisted despite the denomination of the money. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’“Money is a double-edged sword. It produces good outcomes in terms of concentration and effort but bad outcomes when it comes to helping, taking, and donating.” said professor Kathleen Vohs from the University of Minnesota and co-author of the study.For this, the researchers conducted five experiments and one study involving 550 children (ages three-six) in Poland and the US. In one experiment, the children were asked to either sort money or buttons before completing a challenging puzzle. The paper is forthcoming in the journal Psychological Science.last_img read more