Athletic Bilbao director confirms interest in Ander Herrera

first_imgSporting director Rafael Alkorta confirmed Athletic Bilbao’s interest in re-signing former stars Ander Herrera and Fernando LlorenteBoth players will be out of contract at the end of the season at Manchester United and Tottenham respectively.Herrera, who’s been at United since 2014, is understood to be in talks over a new deal, while Llorente could leave Spurs in this month’s transfer window.The 33-year-old striker has previously expressed an interest in rejoining Athletic, where he spent eight years at and scored 111 goals in 327 games, after growing tired of playing second fiddle to Harry Kane at Spurs.Now Alkorta has confirmed Athletic’s interest in Herrera and Llorente along with two other stars.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“We are interested in Javi Martinez, Ibai [Gomez], Ander Herrera, Llorente…” Alkorta told Cadena Ser.“It’s obvious that any player that can play for Athletic is of interest to us.“Nothing is easy but we are interested in having all of the ones that can come. We have not made any moves yet. We will start on Tuesday and we will see what can be done.”Athletic secured their third win of La Liga this season by beating Celta Vigo 2-1 on Monday night after goals from Iker Muniain and Iñaki Williams.The Basque club are now 16th in the standings and two points above the drop zone.last_img read more

New IIHS crash tests give stars for saving pedestrians

first_img More From Roadshow Roadshow 3:20 The new safety tests that start in 2020 will simulate three common pedestrian accident situations: An adult crossing the road as cars approach at both 12 and 25 mphA child popping out from between parked cars, again with cars coming at 12 and 25 mphAn adult walking along the right hand side of the road as cars come up at 25 and 37 mphNew IIHS pedestrian collision ratings arrive at a time of increased pedestrian fatalities, believed to be partly caused by the profusion of high-fronted SUVs that impact chests and heads more than just legs. IIHS Points are awarded based on how well the car detected the pedestrian and slowed, and for how well it alerted the driver — we aren’t in the fully autonomous world yet. This new battery of tests is being added now for three reasons: 1. The number of pedestrians killed by cars in the US spiked over 45% from 2009 to 2017, a much higher rate than the 10% increase in overall auto fatalities during the same period. Reasons often cited include phones distracting drivers and pedestrians, a profusion of SUVs with taller front ends that impact pedestrian heads and chests, not just legs, and pedestrians being drunk in a third of the cases.ped-fatalsPedestrian fatalities are up around 45% since 2009 and have grown from 12% of all car accident fatalities to 16%. That sounds alarm bells. NHTSA 2. Affordable, mainstream cars like the 2019 Hyundai Santa Fe offer the tech to do something about pedestrian impacts, including forward sensors and automatic emergency braking systems. Forty countries have agreed to require automatic emergency braking on new cars as of 2020, though the US has not signed on to that pledge.3. Avoidance technology has been around long enough for insurance industry data to confirm that cars with it are involved in about a third fewer pedestrian collision claims. And never lose sight of the fact that IIHS star ratings, and the showroom appeal they create, are as much a way to force carmakers to build vehicles that result in fewer claims, as they are a service to help you buy a safe car. The new tests will be added to Top Safety Pick criteria in 2020, but a few vehicles have already been subjected to them, with the highest scores going to the Subaru Forester, Honda CR-V, Toyota RAV4 and the Volvo XC40. eyesightTechnologies like Subaru’s highly regarded Eyesight camera system are driving collision avoidance deep into the affordable car category. Subaru The technologies that are achieving those scores today will seem quaint compared to what’s coming: Lidar that not only sees pedestrians but predicts their next move is under development, and 5G-powered V2X connectivity may turn every pedestrian’s phone into a beacon that warns nearby cars of their proximity and giving automatic braking another input to help it do its job. Share your voice 0 Tight handling and new electronics make the 2016 Honda Civic a star compact Now playing: Watch this: The new ratings for IIHS Top Safety Pick cars will soon include how well the car avoids hitting pedestrians, a reflection of advances in technology and a retreat in pedestrian safety. center_img 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S Cabriolet first drive: The uber-roadster Honda Kia Subaru Toyota Volvo Cooley On Cars Never mind the occupants, the safest cars will soon protect… Post a comment 2020 BMW 330e first drive: A plug-in 3 Series without compromise Tagslast_img read more

Why Does Texas Have So Many Counties A History Lesson

first_imgU.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, made news this summer for achieving a long-held goal in his campaign for U.S. Senate — visiting all of Texas’ 254 counties.That’s a lot of travel time, and the news made us — and our readers — wonder why Texas has so many counties. Texas is the second-largest state in both area and population, but it has 95 more counties than any other state.Georgia, with 159, has the second most. Delaware, with three, has the fewest. California, which has the largest population, has just 58 counties.So why does Texas have so many?Basically, Texas is big, and the state’s founders wanted to keep its local governments small. In the state’s early days — Texas became a state in 1845 — Texans needed to be close to those local governments, which were responsible for courts, jails, schools and roads, said lawyer David Brooks, who specializes in Texas county government.Brooks said counties needed to be small enough that residents could travel to and from their courthouse in a day on horseback to do business. Most farmers couldn’t afford to take more than one day off to travel to the county seat.As the state expanded throughout the years and the population increased, the number of counties did, too. The earliest counties in Texas history were called municipios and date back to Spanish rule, according to the Texas Association of Counties. There were 23 municipios in what’s now the southeastern part of the state.Texas became independent in 1836, and the municipios became counties. As settlers moved west, Texas added 14 new counties in under 10 years. When Texas joined the United States, the number of counties went from 37 to 67.When Texas sold land to the United States as part of the Compromise of 1850, another nine counties were added. By 1860, there were 152 counties in the state.Growth slowed during the Civil War and picked up again after Reconstruction, according to Kathryn Siefker, curator at the Bullock Texas State History Museum.The Constitution of 1876, which is what much of Texas state law today is based on, set requirements for Texas counties. New counties had to be at least 900 square miles and, whenever possible, laid out like a grid.Land known as the Young Territory in the Panhandle plains was split into 54 counties that year, which is why northwest Texas counties are squares and rectangles. The borders of older counties in the southern part of the state follow natural boundaries such as water basins, Brooks said.During the end of the 19th century, Texas’ larger counties in the western part of the state were split into smaller units as the population grew.“They found it would be better to go smaller or increase the amount of counties,” Siefker said.The state’s last county, Loving County, was added in 1931.The bottom line:  Texas has 254 counties because it’s so big — with about 28 million people and over 268,00 square miles, it’s the second largest state in both population and area. Texans followed a guideline that no one should be more than a day’s travel from their courthouse, keeping the counties relatively small.Disclosure: The Texas Association of Counties and the Bullock Texas State History Museum have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here. Sharelast_img read more