Wilshere hits back at critics

first_img Photos of the midfielder holding a shisha pipe at a nightclub were posted on social media and quickly made national headlines. On Thursday evening, Wilshere posted on Instagram a video of himself in training as he recovers from ankle surgery along with the message : “Worry about your character not your reputation, because your character is who you are and your reputation is only what people who don’t know you think about you!” Press Association The Gunners are to seek clarification from Wilshere over the circumstances of the incident, which is understood to have happened during a night out with friends in central London last week. A picture of Wilshere was uploaded to Instagram, before being removed and replaced with an edited version where only the face of the Arsenal player was visible in the background. However, the original image, where the England international held the shisha pipe, was then subsequently reposted on Twitter, sparking much debate across social media over the player’s behaviour ahead of Saturday’s north London derby at Tottenham Arsenal take a dim view on players smoking. In January, goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny was hit with a £25,000 fine after it emerged he lit up in the showers following the 2-0 defeat at Southampton on New Year’s Day, since when the Pole has not started a Barclays Premier League match. Wilshere’s representatives said they had nothing further to add when contacted by the Press Association on Thursday. The latest revelations around Wilshere – the midfielder has been criticised in the past after twice being pictured with a cigarette, the previous occasion while on holiday in Las Vegas last summer with England goalkeeper Joe Hart following the 2014 World Cup – will come as an unwelcome distraction to Wenger as he prepares his squad for Saturday’s lunchtime kick off at White Hart Lane, with the subject now set to dominate the agenda at Friday’s morning media conference. Leading scorer Alexis Sanchez will again be out because of a hamstring injury which saw him miss the 5-0 win over Aston Villa, but England forward Danny Welbeck is in line to make a return after being out since December 28 with a thigh problem. Jack Wilshere appeared to hit back at his critics after becoming embroiled in another smoking controversy. Wenger said on the Arsenal club website: “Alexis is not ready. He is not far away, the Leicester game is a possibility. He is of course very difficult to keep quiet. He is training, but it’s light training.” Wenger added Wilshere was set to be “back in full training next week, hopefully from Sunday”. England forward Theo Walcott, meanwhile, is relishing the prospect of the derby atmosphere as Arsenal look to keep the pressure up on the top four. Walcott has just returned to full fitness after the best part of a year on the sidelines when suffering a serious knee injury in the closing minutes of the FA Cup third-round win over Spurs at the Emirates Stadium in January 2014. The 25-year-old was carried off on a stretcher in front of the away supporters, some of whom threw objects to which the player responded with a 2-0 hand gesture. Walcott, whose injury shattered his World Cup dreams, thrives on the rivalry. “This is a massive game and it is all about the bragging rights,” Walcott said in the London Evening Standard. “Things like that have happened in the past and it won’t be forgotten about, I am sure, but it is one thing I have moved on from. “Every player will get stick I am sure, but it is about just trying to go out there and perform.” Walcott, who has scored in successive appearances since his return from a niggling groin problem, added: “Any criticism won’t affect me at all. It is enjoyable – it is a bit different and is always a great atmosphere at White Hart Lane. “It is probably the fixture I always look forward to playing in the most, to be fair. “It is one of the biggest games for both sets of fans and this year it is going to be tight.” last_img read more

The Jersey Speed Skiffs of the Navesink and Shrewsbury Rivers

first_imgBy Rick Geffken |HIGHLANDS – Ned Lloyd spent a lot of time on Shrewsbury and Navesink rivers while growing up in Rumson. That doesn’t make him a whole lot different from thousands of other kids lucky enough to live in and around the Two River peninsula. What distinguishes this current Connecticut resident is that he’s deepened his love for, and encyclopedic knowledge of, the indigenous small crafts of our local waterways, particularly the revered and inimitable Jersey skiff.Lloyd will be the featured speaker at a meeting of the Navesink Maritime Historical Association (NHMA) scheduled for Wednesday evening, Oct. 17 at Bahrs Landing Restaurant. His discussion and presentation, “The Pound Boats and Beach Fisheries of the Jersey Shore” will start after light refreshments at 7:30 p.m. It’s free and open to the public.Lloyd recently made the trip from his home in the Nutmeg State back to Monmouth County to participate in the annual Thunder on the Shrewsbury at the Long Branch Ice Boat & Yacht Club just a few weeks ago. “It’s a rendezvous and get-together,” said Lloyd, “for owners, aficionados, and racers of a Jersey speed skiff which is a Jersey-born, 16-foot inboard race boat class with a strong local following.”These world-renowned Jersey speed skiffs are nothing like the typical fiberglass speedboats running on the Shrewsbury these days, powered by Yamaha or Honda outboards. “Back in the 1960s, they were 50-60 mph wooden-hulled boats, close to the fastest things in the water,” said Lloyd about the local boats he fell in love with as a kid. He noted that an Oceanport resident, Rob Garretano, recently set the American Power Boat Association (APBA) record in Devils Lake, Oregon when his 16-footer hit 85 mph over a quarter-mile run.“It’s fairly well established that the first Jersey speed skiff, named PJ, was built by Harold ‘Pappy’ Seaman in the Port-au-Peck section of Oceanport in 1922. She was strictly a pleasure boat. Pappy’s family was building boats as early as the 1840s. “With a name like that you just have to build boats,” said Lloyd. When smaller, more high-powered in-board marine engines became available in the early 1920s, Seaman’s skills easily ported to the development of a new kind of small wooden watercraft.The story is that J. P. Bowers of Red Bank asked Pappy Seaman to build a little 16-foot boat for his family. “Seaman came up with an unusual deviation, a flat bottom. Previously, Jersey Shore boats had rolled garboard keel bottoms to let them stand upright on the beach, easier to push into the ocean. Those resulting high stern ends also shielded their propellers from damage,” Lloyd said.At the Long Branch Thunder event, Oceanport’s Charlie Boland consulted with Lloyd on some maintenance and restoration aspects of Charlie’s own Suds, named after a similar sea skiff his father once owned. Jim Janeczko of Belford has also relied on Lloyd’s expertise for years. “I bought back my dad’s old 1965 cigar box (boat) and I’m restoring it now.”Lloyd displayed his voluminous scrapbooks, notes and other historic maritime pictures during his visit to the Long Branch Ice Boat & Yacht Club Sept. 29. More than a few visitors suggested Lloyd should write a book showcasing his vast knowledge of this intriguing local subject. “If I ever find time,” is his stock answer.Lloyd was still in grade school in Rumson when he was first attracted to boats. He remembers going to speed skiff races in Atlantic Highlands as well as to the National Sweepstakes Regatta in Red Bank. Speed skiffs were still racing near Oceanport well into the 1970s and Lloyd’s family would travel by boat to watch the races while they anchored nearby. He smiled as he recalled, “Growing up, if I wasn’t in school, I was either mucking around the saltwater marshes, playing with wooden boats or hanging around boatyards.”“There were times I’d be at the tip of Sandy Hook at five in the morning but make it back to homeroom in time,” he said. His consistent classroom attendance paid off. Lloyd eventually graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a major in fisheries and marine technologies. From there he spent a short time working in a small shipyard and now designs custom electric wiring and cable for a living. He’s also a frequent contributor to a boat lover’s website, thehulltruth.com.A pivotal life experience for Lloyd was the 1977 day he got a ramshackle old skiff, long abandoned in Red Bank. It was originally a product of Bill Tallman’s 1930’s-era “Row No More Boats” yard in Fair Haven. Lloyd spent a year and a half restoring Bits ‘N’ Pieces, so called after the driftwood and other jetsam he scavenged. Forty years on, he’s restoring her once again, hoping to have her back in the water next year.NHMA president Rik van Hemmen said, “Ned Lloyd has one of the best collections of information, memorabilia and pictures of the Jersey Sea Skiff and the local builders.”To learn more about Ned Lloyd’s local appearances or the NHMA, visit navesinkmaritime.org/events.This article was first published in the Oct. 11 – Oct. 17, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Annual Beach Sweeps Report: Record Number of Volunteers; Balloon Remnants Soar

first_img“We saw over 81 percent of the debris that we collected was plastic, including foam, which is down a little bit from last year,” Alison McCarthy, the coastal watershed protection coordinator for Clean Ocean Action, said April 2 at a beachside press conference at Sandy Hook. “But it’s still astoundingly high and makes up a very large majority of the data.” Cindy Zipf, executive director of Clean Ocean Action, spoke about the impact plastics have on marine wildlife. In one high-profile example, a whale found dead last month in Italy had about 50 pounds of plastic in its belly. Clean Ocean Action has been organizing beach sweeps since 1985. In that time, 6.7 million pieces of debris have been collected by 133,390 volunteers, McCarthy said. This year’s spring Beach Sweeps will be April 13, at sites from north Jersey to Cape May. Among some of the more unusual items found were a 1930s Philadelphia rail token, a rattrap, a full couch, dentures and a vacuum cleaner. In 2018, 454,365 pieces of debris were collected by 10,148 volunteers at 60 sites around the state, mostly along the Jersey Shore, during the organization’s 33rd annual “Beach Sweeps” of coastline and other areas. Those were record amounts, in material collected and volunteers who participated, in the history of the cleanups. “So there’s somewhere for everybody to join in and get out onto the beaches and give the beaches a good clean sweep,” Zipf said. “We’re not going out on the beaches to give them a clean sweep just because it makes the beaches look good and it makes them safer for marine life. We want to stop these sources of litter, and we want to stop them…at the source.” Once again, the organization is calling for a ban on plastic bags and enforcement of litter laws. Zipf also said wind is a“major source” of litter; trashcans get blown over on awindy day and waste getsblown around. She urgedpeople to make sure theyhave a sealed trash container. The Monmouth County-based environmental group Clean Ocean Action said it recovered everything from balloons to furniture when it cleaned up coastal New Jersey last year. “So the really common items that we’re seeing out on the beaches are plastic and many of them are single-use plastics,” McCarthy said. By Philip Sean Curran “So, pretty fascinatingstuff that we find out on theJersey Shore,” McCarthysaid. “All this plastic debris that we find is absolutely our responsibility,” Zipf said. “We can’t blame Mother Nature for any of this. This is all us being sloppy and not taking care of the products that we use.” “So they’ll find their way into a stream, into a bigger river, and those rivers, of course, all water ways lead to the ocean,” she said. “So that’s how all of that debris gets out into the ocean eventually and then washes up onto the shore.” McCarthy explained thejourney debris takes once itgoes down a storm drain andthen into a waterway. She also pointed to the prevalence of balloons, with a record-setting 5,470 of them collected – a 32 percent increase from 2017. The organization this week issued its annual report highlighting what was found during the cleanups, held in April and October. Topping its “dirty dozen” list of the “most commonly” found objects were plastic pieces, at 75,899, followed by plastic caps and lids at 61,358. Both occupied the top two spots in 2017 and in 2016, the report said. The organization has said its data has been used by government officials to protect the environment. In particular, the group pointed to Gov. Phil Murphy last year signing into law a ban on smoking at all public parks and beaches,effective in 2019. Zipf saidLittle Silver had just bannedplastic bags, straws and foamcontainers town-wide. Zipf said she supports aplastic bag ban, a step NewYork state will take in 2020.last_img read more

CALIFORNIA CUP OAKS QUOTES – SATURDAY JANUARY 28, 2017

first_imgJOCKEY QUOTES JOE TURNER, SIRCAT SALLY, WINNER: “This is special. Three different riders, three different wins, three different tracks and two different surfaces . . . what more could you ask for?“I still have the dam and people from the Square Eddie camp are very anxious to see the baby. She’s in foal to him now.“I could breed back to Surf Cat, too, she’s doing so well with him. I was going to try to get her to Vronsky but I’m undecided. I’ve known Bruce Headley for many, many years so I may lean his way (and breed to Surf Cat).” JERRY HOLLENDORFER, SIRCAT SALLY, WINNER: “That was the question, whether she would do that or not (run well on turf), and she did it I think in pretty nice fashion. I was very pleased the way she rated off the pace, and showed good enough speed to get up and be tactical. That was very beautiful, for me.”Hollendorfer added he had “no thoughts yet” on her next race.             NOTES: Winning owner Joe Turner is from Fresno. TYLER BAZE, SIRCAT SALLY, WINNER: “I had a beautiful trip. Mr. Hollendorfer and I talked before about the speed in the race and he left it up to me. She pulled me to the lead. I just let her break and find her own stride. She loved it. She was comfortable out there and had no problems sitting second. It was a fun ride.” TRAINER QUOTES -30-last_img read more