Vermont Tech Receives $25,000 to Help Fund Summer Bridge Program

first_imgVermont Tech Receives $25,000to Help Fund Summer Bridge ProgramRANDOLPH CENTER, Vt-Vermont Technical College this week received a $25,000 grant from the J. Warren and Lois McClure Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Vermont Community Foundation.The money will be used to support Vermont Tech’s Summer Bridge Program, which helps incoming freshmen prepare for the college level math and English courses they’ll need to succeed in most of the college’s rigorous programs.While the Summer Bridge program is affordable in comparison to academic year tuition, board and fees, it has in the past been a deterrent to low- to moderate-income students who count on their summer break to earn money for the academic year. The college estimates that between 10 and 15 students each year choose not to enroll at Vermont Tech because of the cost of the Program.The Summer Bridge program is required for students applying to the Applied Science Program and will shorten by one year the time required for engineering students to graduate. The program provides courses in Math, Physics, Computer Skills and English. Students who do not enroll in the program are often required to take remedial courses elsewhere, potentially postponing their entry to Vermont Tech.An estimated seventy percent of Summer Bridge students are “first generation” (the first in their families to attend college) and a large majority of these are Vermont residents. The program typically enrolls between 30-50 students.Founded in 1986, the Vermont Community Foundation is home to over 500 charitable funds. With more than $160 million in assets, (December 31, 2007), it ranks among the top 10 percent of community foundations nationwide for total assets and gifts received. The Foundation helps Vermont-based philanthropists and organizations gain knowledge about community needs; deepen their understanding of ways strategic philanthropy can make a difference; nurture innovative practices and invest in the most promising models for lasting change; and increase Vermont’s philanthropic capital by inspiring new giving opportunities.Vermont Technical College is the state’s only technical college and is one of the five Vermont State Colleges. Graduates from Vermont Tech enjoy a 98% job placement rate; 90% of the student body comes from Vermont; and in 2007, 87% took jobs in Vermont, growing and improving the state’s workforce.last_img read more

CUDEs raise over $60,000 in 2017 to improve people’s lives

first_imgAs most of you know, the Credit Union Development Education (DE) Program takes place four times a year and aims to invigorate and educate credit union professionals on credit union history, principles and philosophy. What you might not know is that during each DE Training, the participants are asked to complete a specific project, one that involves planning, fundraising, hands-on work and improves people’s lives in some way. These projects show Credit Union Development Educators (CUDEs) that they can make a difference, and they are tasked with completing their own DE project when they return home to their credit unions.For the first two trainings in 2017, participants were asked to raise funds to support the Helping Hands Project, an organization that provides prosthetic hands to children across the world who have suffered a loss. As you can imagine, many families in rural countries do not have the financial means or the access to services for children with limb loss. These prosthesis are life changing for them.Each class is given a fundraising goal to reach, and they work in small groups to raise the funds and actually assemble one of the prosthetic hands. These hands were then placed in personalized and decorated bags to be given to a child in need. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more