Bloomberg Businessweek Taking Print Delivery Into Own Hands

first_imgAfter Bloomberg bought the magazine in late 2009, incoming president Paul Bascobert initiated discussions on enhancing the its delivery options. By December 2010, subscribers in Philadelphia were getting the magazine through a partnership with the Philadelphia Inquirer on Friday mornings. By August this year similar partnerships will be rolled out in Portland, Oregon, Chicago and in southern California from Los Angeles to San Diego. “We’re in the process of getting signed contracts as we speak,” says Bernie Schraml, director of manufacturing and distribution for Bloomberg Businessweek. “It will be a mix of newspaper companies and private delivery companies in those markets.”Partnerships in the New York metro area, New Jersey and Connecticut are expected to launch by October. In all, Schraml is expecting to have about 250,000 subscriber copies delivered by this method by the end of the year, maybe more. “We don’t have any limit at all as far as the total number of copies,” he says. “The more the better.” How It WorksSchraml identifies regions of the country where there’s a combination of problematic delivery, sufficient entry points and appropriate and available delivery partners. After an NDA is in place with the partner company, Bloomberg Businessweek provides a copy of its subscriber file for that region to the partner. The highest density areas are selected for delivery. Schraml declined to reveal pricing arrangements, citing confidential agreements, but costs vary according to subscriber density and are determined by the number of copies delivered into the area. Overall, costs are comparable to traditional delivery of subscriber copies. “I don’t have a budget to increase my costs, I can tell you that,” clarifies Schraml. In markets where the alternative delivery system will launch, customers are notified either by a letter polybagged or cover-wrapped with the issue two weeks prior. Subscribers can choose to stay with postal delivery or take the alternate Friday morning delivery. So far, Schraml says there’s been a ratio of under 1 per 1,000 customers who’ve asked to go back to the traditional delivery method. The magazine is delivered in its own polybag, soft-folded and handled separately from the newspaper. Bloomberg Businessweek has been rapidly expanding an “alternative distribution” plan to print subscribers. Since last December the magazine has been partnering with newspaper publishers and other delivery services to have the magazine hand-delivered with the Friday morning paper. Currently, 9 percent of the magazine’s 860,000 domestic print subscribers already receive the magazine this way. The publisher wants to expand into other metro regions and raise that to 30 percent by the end of the year.And that figure is just a 4Q 2011 goal. The magazine likely won’t stop there. Instead, to counteract delays caused by the Postal Service’s FSS equipment and a potential five-day delivery schedule, it will continue to explore ways to transition more print subscriber copies away from USPS delivery and into co-delivery with newspaper publishers and other private delivery services. Right now, the weekly magazine achieves about a 60 percent cumulative delivery rate between Friday and Saturday with the Postal Service. The remainder of subscriber copies arrive sometime between Monday and Wednesday-the latest arriving almost a week after the issue ships. By partnering with a major newspaper and/or a private carrier, the magazine has a guaranteed Friday delivery by 6 am. last_img read more

Seat Minimó concept brings a twee electric car to Geneva

first_img See All 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata review: Club life isn’t for everyone, and that’s OK 50 Photos • reading • Seat Minimó concept brings a twee electric car to Geneva Seat Minimó concept is all about urban mobility Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8s Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Post a comment 0 Share your voice 2019 Mazda CX-9 review: Losing its edge? Concept Cars Electric Cars As cars become rolling platforms of technology, we’re starting to see them pop up in odd places. CES is now practically its own auto show, and recently, VW Group’s Spanish division Seat unveiled a concept car at MWC, the world’s biggest phone show, in its hometown Barcelona. But now, it’s made its way to the Geneva Motor Show.To be fair, the Seat Minimó concept is only barely a car. Seat actually refers to it as a quadricycle, taking some aspects of cars and blending them with some aspects of motorcycles. It’s a tiny little guy, with enough space for two people and little else. If you want to bring a passenger and a suitcase, you’ll have to stow the suitcase out back, exposed to the elements.As for the interior, it’s on the minimalist side. The doors are hinged to make it possible for you to get in and out in tight spaces, and the front seat slides forward to offer passenger access. The dashboard is straightforward, with your standard steering wheel and brakes, in addition to a gauge cluster screen that appears to double as an infotainment system.Enlarge ImageIt’s like a Renault Twizy, but way less dorky. Andrew Hoyle/Roadshow That small footprint may not help with hauling, but since this concept is built for urbanites, its tiny dimensions should leave it well suited to handle tight corners and busy streets. It also happens to be electric, which means it’ll be no problem in European city centers that have implemented diesel bans or congestion charges for gas guzzlers. The Minimó concept is designed not to be owned, but to be shared — it’s not something Seat envisions living in your driveway. Instead, it will be out and about all day, lending itself to urbanites in need of a ride. To that end, it’ll keep downtime to a minimum thanks to a hot-swappable battery that slides out from underneath the body. Seat estimates this could reduce car-sharing operation costs by some 50 percent, since there’ll be little if any downtime. Its battery is small, but since everything is small, range clocks in at a decent 62 miles.Other bits of the concept’s tech are also aimed at the mobility market. There’s no physical key — access is found digitally, using a smart device. That same device can bring navigation into the car by way of wireless Android Auto. The concept relies on human drivers, but it could theoretically be outfitted to run autonomously, becoming even more efficient by minimizing the time it spends idle. Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Geneva Motor Show 2019 Tags Geneva Motor Show 2019 Mobile World Congress 2019 More From Roadshow 2019 Audi TT Roadster review: The exit interview Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the USlast_img read more

United Methodists vote pensions Traditional Plan as top priorities

first_img Delegates attend the first day of deliberations at the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit Doyle Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Share This! News • Photos of the Week By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Share This! Share This! TagsLGBT LGBTQ Top Story UMCGC United Methodist Church United Methodist Church General Conference,You may also like Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Meantime, the One Church Plan, recommended by the church’s Council of Bishops, received support from about half of the delegates.These results determined the order in which plans and petitions will be considered by the General Conference.While Sunday’s vote results don’t necessarily mean the Traditional Plan has the most support of the plans that will be considered this week in St. Louis, it still felt that way to many of its supporters and opponents.People now are walking around the Dome singing and chanting “Hate divides, love provides.” #UMCGC pic.twitter.com/eXBGe7haqJ— Emily McFarlan Miller (@emmillerwrites) February 24, 2019“We have a long way to go, but we’re encouraged,” said the Rev. Keith Boyette, president of the Wesleyan Covenant Association, an organized conservative group that supports the ban on LGBT clergy. Boyette has said if the One Church Plan or another called the Simple Plan passes, he would recommend the group form a new denomination.Sunday’s vote is just the first step toward adopting any plan, he said. Delegates will have a chance to amend the plan before deciding whether to approve it.But, he said, he believes the Traditional Plan now has the advantage because it will be taken up and amended first, and the time spent on it won’t be available to spend on other plans. And he feels that ranking will translate into votes, as its supporters were urged going into the session to rank the Traditional Plan a high priority and all others low.Boyette also said he wasn’t surprised pensions ranked first. Delegates need to address what would happen to the pensions of clergy who leave the denomination if they disagree with the decisions made this week by the General Conference, he said.RELATED: The ’Splainer: What’s the United Methodist special session all about?The special session opened Sunday morning with a sermon from Bishop Ken Carter, president of the Council of Bishops, who said delegates should focus on what unites them, not what divides them.Bishop Christian Alsted, who presided over the morning session of the General Conference, reminded delegates that “we are not gathered here in St. Louis to discuss and to decide on an issue or on a question. We are speaking about people in the church.”Allison Vellas, of Ink Factory, creates a live illustration of the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit DoyleThe special session of the General Conference hopes to resolve a decades-long debate over sexuality in the nation’s second-largest Protestant denomination.Currently, the denomination’s rulebook, the Book of Discipline, states that “the practice of homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teaching” and that “self-avowed practicing homosexuals” cannot be ordained as ministers, appointed to serve or married in the church.Locked in a stalemate over attempts to change those rules, delegates at the 2016 General Conference voted to defer all decisions on related legislation to a specially appointed Commission on a Way Forward. That led to this week’s special session to receive and act on a report including three plans proposed by the commission.Jessica LaGrone, a member of the Commission on a Way Forward, presents the Traditional Plan during the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit DoyleOn Sunday morning, commission members explained their work and described the three plans for moving forward.Jessica LaGrone, an elder from Kentucky, said the Traditional Plan, which strengthens the enforcement of current rules, “values consistency in practice.” She compared it to the denomination’s stances on the ordination of women or infant baptism.Jasmine Rose Smothers, an elder from Georgia, described the One Church Plan supported by the Council of Bishops. That plan would allow individual churches and regional annual conferences to decide whether to ordain and marry LGBTQ members.With 49 percent of delegates ranking the plan a high priority, it will be considered fifth.“The One Church Plan does not see unity as uniformity,” Smothers said.Mazvita Machinga, a member of the Commission on a Way Forward, presents the Connectional Conference Plan during the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit DoyleMazvita Machinga, a laywoman from Zimbabwe, presented the Connectional Conference Plan, which would reorganize United Methodist churches by conferences based on theological beliefs, rather than by geographical location.“Yes, it is the most complex of all the plans,” Machinga said. She added that complexity is needed for United Methodists to remain one church.Just 12 percent of delegates considered the Connectional Conference Plan a high priority.Other plans approved for consideration that were not part of the report by the Commission on a Way Forward include: the Simple Plan, which would remove all language about “the practice of homosexuality” from the Book of Discipline, and the modified Traditional Plan, which was referred to a committee. After the presentation of the three plans in the report, commission member Brian Adkins, an elder from California who identified himself as an openly gay pastor, told LGBTQ United Methodists from the stage, “No matter what happens in this room or anywhere else, there is a place for you at God’s table, and no one can take it from you.”Good morning from St. Louis, where delegates and observers arriving to the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference early this morning were met with song. #umc #umcgc #gc2019 pic.twitter.com/JuaRILQxMc— Emily McFarlan Miller (@emmillerwrites) February 24, 2019Delegates and observers arriving at the special session early Sunday morning were met with that same message.About two dozen members of the Queer Clergy Caucus sang “Jesus Loves Me” and other familiar songs as people lined up to enter the Dome at America’s Center, where the meeting will run through Tuesday. Some wore rainbow-colored stoles around their necks. Others held signs with messages introducing themselves: “I am a trans pastor” and “I am a lesbian sibling in Christ.”RELATED: What will happen at the special session? Here’s what United Methodists predict“Good morning, church! Welcome to worship,” said the Rev. Austin Adkinson, a Seattle pastor and member of the Queer Clergy Caucus leadership team who led the singing.The clergy and their supporters wanted to greet delegates at the start of the conference in a “celebratory way” and make sure LGBTQ United Methodists were part of the conversation inside, Adkinson said, because “this conference is all about us.”“The real main point of all of this is to remind people it’s more than an issue. It’s not just theology. Real lives are on the line,” he said.Supporters for the Simple Plan hold banners and sing before the afternoon session at the special session of the United Methodist General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. Photo by Kathleen Barry/UMNSAfter the vote Sunday afternoon, the mood turned somber for advocates of the full inclusion of LGBTQ people in the church.A number of people left their seats, marching through the building with a rainbow flag, singing and chanting “Love provides, hate divides.” Their action was a “spontaneous cry from the soul,” said Carol Scott, a member of Methodists in New Direction, which supports LGBTQ inclusion.To Scott, the prioritization vote felt like “55 percent of the body voted to clamp down even harder on children of God.”Scott and the Rev. Traci C. West, professor of Christian ethics and African-American studies at Drew University Theological School in Madison, N.J., reminded advocates gathered outside the session that this wasn’t the last day of the conference. It wasn’t even the vote to approve any of the plans before conference delegates.There was singing again as delegates left at the end of the evening, and a word of encouragement from Bishop Karen Oliveto, the first openly lesbian bishop in the United Methodist Church.“God’s not done with us yet,” Oliveto said. Anti-extremism program won’t stop hate, say Muslims who’ve seen its flaws August 30, 2019 Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,ST. LOUIS (RNS) — Delegates to a special session of the United Methodist Church decided Sunday (Feb. 24) to start deliberations over the denomination’s future by talking about money.Then they will talk about sex.Those delegates ranked a discussion of the church’s pension plan as their top priority, followed by a plan that would strengthen a ban on LGBTQ clergy and same-sex marriage.Two-thirds (nearly 64 percent) voted for a discussion of the implications of a church split on pensions as their top priority.Nearly 56 percent of the 864 delegates to the General Conference’s special session on sexuality agreed that the Traditional Plan — one of three presented by a specially appointed commission – was a high priority for the global denomination’s decision-making body. By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Pope Francis calls for ‘all-out battle’ against child sex abuse Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Emily McFarlan Miller Emily McFarlan Miller is a national reporter for RNS based in Chicago. She covers evangelical and mainline Protestant Christianity.,Load Comments,Eyeing Amazon synod, Brazil accuses church of ‘leftist agenda’ News Delegates attend the first day of deliberations at the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit Doyle Delegates attend the first day of deliberations at the special session of the United Methodist Church General Conference in St. Louis on Feb. 24, 2019. RNS photo by Kit Doyle Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This! By: Emily McFarlan Miller emmillerwrites News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

Kalam Teacher par excellence

first_imgThe People’s President was as much the Pupils’ President. So the eminent educationist Satyam Roychowdhury has named his latest literary venture as “Pupils’ President – APJ Abdul Kalam”. The 11th President of India, the ‘Missile Man’ behind India’s nuclear power, loved to be recognized as a teacher at the end of the day. Even at the age of 84, he used to travel a lot in and outside the country for delivering lectures at varied educational institutes.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’In fact, he loved interacting with the students, inspiring them not only to dream, but to transform the dream into reality. He expressed his wish for dying while doing what he liked the most.  It really happened. He passed away while delivering lecture before the students of IIM, Shillong.Satyam Roychowdhury’s “Pupils’.President – APJ Abdul Kalam” is probably the first literary tribute to Kalam after his demise. It is a complete compilation of articles and speeches by the great soul himself along with contributions by eminent scientists and scholars from across the globe. Article like “Paperboy to President “depicts the story of his struggle through the ages. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix The little boy who used to deliver newspapers in Rameswaram, later on became a great scientist and eventually acquired the throne of the President of India. The inspiring prologue by the editor is a good read and will ignite the young minds as dreamt by Kalam. The minute description of Kalam’s last rites at Pekkarampu village near his hometown Rameswaram and thereafter the story of his journey “From Rameswaram to Raisina Hills” added a value to the book. The compilation of Kalam’s speeches through the month of July 2015 is well thought of. Moreover, homage articles by Dr Bikash Sinha or those who had the golden chance to come across the great scientist have made the book a collection worth preserving. “Pupils’ President – APJ Abdul Kalam” has been formally launched by Sourav Ganguly on the Teachers’ Day in Kolkata. Sourav was nostalgic as he not only received Padmashri from his hand, but later on also was in close acquaintance with Kalam Sir. He said, “For me, he was a Guru.” Satyam Roychowdhury explained how Kalam’s life fascinated him in many ways. “He has always been my hero. This book commemorates the life of a man who worked tirelessly for the betterment of the nation and to ignite billions of young minds”, said Roychowdhury. It is a very good gesture on the parts of the editor and the publisher BEE Books to offer 50% discount to the students all over India. Sources said, on the World Teachers’ Day which falls on October 5, Satyam Roychowdhury will gift 1000 school students with this book in Kolkata.last_img read more

Celebrating Uniqueness

first_imgArtists Malay Karmakar, Archna Jaideep singh, Neena Talwar and fashion designer Swati Suri combined their passion for painting and fashion designing and shared their artistic journey through an exhibition organised by Vikram Sethi, a Bharat Nirman awardee in 2005 for the best art curator of the year, open to the public from July 30 till August 6 at the ITC Sheraton Hotel in the national Capital.  Karmakar has been painting for thirty years and his style is distinctive of cubism and is worthy of drawing a comparison to the great Picasso. His paintings have work on palm leaves, boards, and canvases and give an insight into the “man with nature” concept. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Artist Archna Jaideep Singh too, has been painting for thirty years. Her nudes and abstract work aim at portraying beauty in its most natural form, transcending boundaries of geography, culture and time. Artist Neena Talwar who has been painting since 1976 has a style of charcoal on paper which has been appreciated by one and all. Designer Swati Suri is known for her innovative designs on fabrics. Her design label ‘Cobia’ has a unique collection of evening and informal dresses in rich and vibrant colours each dress unique in itself.last_img read more

Envy is Good

first_img 1 min read This story appears in the March 2010 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » February 16, 2010 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Laptop engineers and designers spent much of last year trying to outdo the Apple MacBook Pro. That’s what happens when a machine aimed at business professionals sets a new standard for performance and style. Few challengers have come close, but you can make a pretty good argument for the HP Envy 15. It’s a classy chassis: a thin, 5-pound-or-so unit with a somewhat psychedelically patterned top that’s toned down by cool, businesslike gunmetal shading. Performance-wise, it’s a laptop that surpasses many desktop PCs, with world-beating processing speed from Intel’s 1.6 GHz Core i7 chip, along with a 6 GB DDR3 memory, 500 GB, 7,200 RPM hard drive fronted by Windows 7. Still, seamless multitasking has a price: $1,800 for starters. Also, that i7 sucker runs hot, which means your in-flight tray table would be a better place to set it down than in your lap–unless heat is, you know, your thing. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more