Airports Authority Staff Attend Security Training Course in Providenciales

first_img Recommended for you Related Items:john pears, lindamae malcolm, Tciaa Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppPROVIDENCIALES, Turks & Caicos Islands, Monday, September 22nd, 2014 – Security officers and division managers from the Turks and Caicos Islands Airports Authority (TCIAA) on Monday begin an Aviation Security Managers training course in Providenciales. The five day course is a UK Department for Transportation recognized training course being run by Atlantic Group Associates (AGA), a Florida-based security training and consultancy firm.The training course is required by any person who has a managerial responsibility for aviation security, either with an airport, airline or aviation service provider. It mirrors those required in the UK, and brings together aviation security personnel from across the Caribbean.John Pears, the lead instructor for the course said, “AGA has a long history with the UK Overseas Territories, having been contracted to provide aviation and maritime security advice to Governor’s, Directors of Civil Aviation and air and sea port personnel from 1998 – 2012.”He further stated that “during this time both this course and the training for trainers course which will be conducted next week, were delivered annually although this is the first time that they are being delivered in the Turks and Caicos Islands.”In a statement, Lindamae Malcolm, TCIAA Security Manager said “the Airports Authority prides itself as an organization that offers its employees the opportunity for progressive training in their respective fields to ensure they are equipped with the key skills necessary to operate in a challenging environment.”She added, “we recognize the importance of continuous staff training, especially for those individuals engaged in exercising security controls.” The Airports Authority has an obligation to meet international standards, and training plays an important role in the process. Not only is the organization promoting security, but the traveling public can take comfort that their safety is not being taken for granted.On the part of the Security Officers being trained, it presents them with a unique opportunity to both acquire new skill and enhance the current one in the rapidly expanding aviation industry. Lindamae concluded that “the aviation security field is now a highly sought after career option.”John Pears, a veteran security expert, will be assisted by Omar Bolivar, both of whom bring several years of experience to the classroom. The training is being conducted at the FORTIS conference facility on Leeward Highway. Airports Authority commanded to protect South Caicos airport by airline Former Premier says PNP left plan for Salt Cay airport, but there is no evidence of the claim Airports Authority reveals sabotage at South Caicos Airport Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Trump says Apple will be fine should still move iPhone production to

first_imgMark Wilson / Getty Images President Donald Trump is chiming in on Apple’s sales warning from earlier this week, an announcement that prompted a quick drop in the iPhone maker’s stock price.”They’re gonna be fine,” Trump said Friday at a White House news conference. “Apple is a great company.”In a letter to investors Wednesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook said revenue in the company’s fiscal first quarter would be lower than expected, a rare occurrence from one of the most valuable and profitable companies in the world. Apple shares fell 7 percent to $147 in trading after the market close on Wednesday. Shares fell another 9.5 percent to $142.88 on Thursday morning, before rebounding 1.6 percent to $144.52 in early Friday trading.Trump said Apple’s stock price has gone up “hundreds of percent” since he’s been president, but added that he wants the company to make its iPhone and other products in the US. “Don’t forget this: Apple makes their product in China,” Trump said. “I told Tim Cook, who’s a friend of mine who I like a lot, ‘Make your product in the United States. Build those big, beautiful plants that go on for miles, it seems. Build those plants in the United States.’…China is the biggest beneficiary of Apple, more than us, because they build their product mostly in China.”Neither Apple nor the White House immediately responded to requests for comment. Comments reading • Trump says Apple will be ‘fine,’ should still move iPhone production to US See it $999 Best Buy $999 • See It See It Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Boost Mobile Apple iPhone XS Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR 9 Phones Politics Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) See All Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Sprint Share your voice Apple Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors $999 See It CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $999 Tags Applelast_img read more

Why Does Texas Have So Many Counties A History Lesson

first_imgU.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, made news this summer for achieving a long-held goal in his campaign for U.S. Senate — visiting all of Texas’ 254 counties.That’s a lot of travel time, and the news made us — and our readers — wonder why Texas has so many counties. Texas is the second-largest state in both area and population, but it has 95 more counties than any other state.Georgia, with 159, has the second most. Delaware, with three, has the fewest. California, which has the largest population, has just 58 counties.So why does Texas have so many?Basically, Texas is big, and the state’s founders wanted to keep its local governments small. In the state’s early days — Texas became a state in 1845 — Texans needed to be close to those local governments, which were responsible for courts, jails, schools and roads, said lawyer David Brooks, who specializes in Texas county government.Brooks said counties needed to be small enough that residents could travel to and from their courthouse in a day on horseback to do business. Most farmers couldn’t afford to take more than one day off to travel to the county seat.As the state expanded throughout the years and the population increased, the number of counties did, too. The earliest counties in Texas history were called municipios and date back to Spanish rule, according to the Texas Association of Counties. There were 23 municipios in what’s now the southeastern part of the state.Texas became independent in 1836, and the municipios became counties. As settlers moved west, Texas added 14 new counties in under 10 years. When Texas joined the United States, the number of counties went from 37 to 67.When Texas sold land to the United States as part of the Compromise of 1850, another nine counties were added. By 1860, there were 152 counties in the state.Growth slowed during the Civil War and picked up again after Reconstruction, according to Kathryn Siefker, curator at the Bullock Texas State History Museum.The Constitution of 1876, which is what much of Texas state law today is based on, set requirements for Texas counties. New counties had to be at least 900 square miles and, whenever possible, laid out like a grid.Land known as the Young Territory in the Panhandle plains was split into 54 counties that year, which is why northwest Texas counties are squares and rectangles. The borders of older counties in the southern part of the state follow natural boundaries such as water basins, Brooks said.During the end of the 19th century, Texas’ larger counties in the western part of the state were split into smaller units as the population grew.“They found it would be better to go smaller or increase the amount of counties,” Siefker said.The state’s last county, Loving County, was added in 1931.The bottom line:  Texas has 254 counties because it’s so big — with about 28 million people and over 268,00 square miles, it’s the second largest state in both population and area. Texans followed a guideline that no one should be more than a day’s travel from their courthouse, keeping the counties relatively small.Disclosure: The Texas Association of Counties and the Bullock Texas State History Museum have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here. Sharelast_img read more

Envy is Good

first_img 1 min read This story appears in the March 2010 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » February 16, 2010 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Laptop engineers and designers spent much of last year trying to outdo the Apple MacBook Pro. That’s what happens when a machine aimed at business professionals sets a new standard for performance and style. Few challengers have come close, but you can make a pretty good argument for the HP Envy 15. It’s a classy chassis: a thin, 5-pound-or-so unit with a somewhat psychedelically patterned top that’s toned down by cool, businesslike gunmetal shading. Performance-wise, it’s a laptop that surpasses many desktop PCs, with world-beating processing speed from Intel’s 1.6 GHz Core i7 chip, along with a 6 GB DDR3 memory, 500 GB, 7,200 RPM hard drive fronted by Windows 7. Still, seamless multitasking has a price: $1,800 for starters. Also, that i7 sucker runs hot, which means your in-flight tray table would be a better place to set it down than in your lap–unless heat is, you know, your thing. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more