Seat Minimó concept brings a twee electric car to Geneva

first_img See All 2019 Mazda MX-5 Miata review: Club life isn’t for everyone, and that’s OK 50 Photos • reading • Seat Minimó concept brings a twee electric car to Geneva Seat Minimó concept is all about urban mobility Mar 7 • The Ferrari F8 Tributo is the last of the nonhybrid V8s Mar 7 • New Peugeot 208 debuts i-Cockpit with 3D HUD Combo dashboard Post a comment 0 Share your voice 2019 Mazda CX-9 review: Losing its edge? Concept Cars Electric Cars As cars become rolling platforms of technology, we’re starting to see them pop up in odd places. CES is now practically its own auto show, and recently, VW Group’s Spanish division Seat unveiled a concept car at MWC, the world’s biggest phone show, in its hometown Barcelona. But now, it’s made its way to the Geneva Motor Show.To be fair, the Seat Minimó concept is only barely a car. Seat actually refers to it as a quadricycle, taking some aspects of cars and blending them with some aspects of motorcycles. It’s a tiny little guy, with enough space for two people and little else. If you want to bring a passenger and a suitcase, you’ll have to stow the suitcase out back, exposed to the elements.As for the interior, it’s on the minimalist side. The doors are hinged to make it possible for you to get in and out in tight spaces, and the front seat slides forward to offer passenger access. The dashboard is straightforward, with your standard steering wheel and brakes, in addition to a gauge cluster screen that appears to double as an infotainment system.Enlarge ImageIt’s like a Renault Twizy, but way less dorky. Andrew Hoyle/Roadshow That small footprint may not help with hauling, but since this concept is built for urbanites, its tiny dimensions should leave it well suited to handle tight corners and busy streets. It also happens to be electric, which means it’ll be no problem in European city centers that have implemented diesel bans or congestion charges for gas guzzlers. The Minimó concept is designed not to be owned, but to be shared — it’s not something Seat envisions living in your driveway. Instead, it will be out and about all day, lending itself to urbanites in need of a ride. To that end, it’ll keep downtime to a minimum thanks to a hot-swappable battery that slides out from underneath the body. Seat estimates this could reduce car-sharing operation costs by some 50 percent, since there’ll be little if any downtime. Its battery is small, but since everything is small, range clocks in at a decent 62 miles.Other bits of the concept’s tech are also aimed at the mobility market. There’s no physical key — access is found digitally, using a smart device. That same device can bring navigation into the car by way of wireless Android Auto. The concept relies on human drivers, but it could theoretically be outfitted to run autonomously, becoming even more efficient by minimizing the time it spends idle. Apr 17 • The 2020 Jaguar XE gets its first major visual refresh Geneva Motor Show 2019 Tags Geneva Motor Show 2019 Mobile World Congress 2019 More From Roadshow 2019 Audi TT Roadster review: The exit interview Mar 8 • VW is still ‘100 percent’ investigating a pickup truck for the USlast_img read more

Activists Want To Delay Funding Vote On I45 Expansion

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen UPDATE (July 26, 2019): At Friday’s meeting, the H-GAC Transportation Policy Council voted to approve the $100 million allocation for the project, along with another $50 million for flood mitigation. The vote followed a lengthy public meeting in which speakers asked the group to delay the allocation. TxDOT says there will be more public input before any work on the project goes forward.The proposed $7 billion I-45 widening project would extend from downtown Houston to Beltway 8 North. TxDOT says the work is needed to support the region’s growing population, but many people along the route are worried about losing their homes and businesses because of the expansion.TxDOT is now asking the Houston-Galveston Area Council to pitch in $100 million as a show of local support for the project. The money would go toward widening the segment of I-45 between I-10 and the North 610 Loop.One of those concerned about the impact on local communities is Oni Blair with the transportation advocacy group LINK Houston. She told News 88.7 she’s concerned that not all voices are being heard.“We see an opportunity to have real conversations that are right now led by the City of Houston in order to address that but we need time for those conversations,” said Blair.Blair is appealing to the H-GAC Transportation Policy Council to delay this Friday’s planned vote on whether to allocate the funding. Also asking for a delay is Fifth Ward Super Neighborhood President Joetta Stevenson, who said her community is still dealing with the impacts of previous freeway projects like I-10 and U.S. 59.“We’re under siege in terms of environmental issues, in terms of other people’s ideas of how transportation should flow, and we seem to be at their mercy,” said Stevenson.Air Alliance Houston also expressed concern about the I-45 expansion. Spokeswoman Leticia Ablaza said they’re already seeing high rates of asthma among children living near freeways. She added that a lot of people who could be affected by the I-45 expansion may not even know about it.“The Hispanic community, a lot of them have not been notified,” said Ablaza. “They predominately speak Spanish and we’re trying to get the materials out in Spanish, we’re trying to get everyone included.”The H-GAC Transportation Policy Council meets this Friday morning at 9:30 at 3555 Timmons Lane. X – / 10center_img 00:00 /00:45 Sharelast_img read more