Trump says Apple will be fine should still move iPhone production to

first_imgMark Wilson / Getty Images President Donald Trump is chiming in on Apple’s sales warning from earlier this week, an announcement that prompted a quick drop in the iPhone maker’s stock price.”They’re gonna be fine,” Trump said Friday at a White House news conference. “Apple is a great company.”In a letter to investors Wednesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook said revenue in the company’s fiscal first quarter would be lower than expected, a rare occurrence from one of the most valuable and profitable companies in the world. Apple shares fell 7 percent to $147 in trading after the market close on Wednesday. Shares fell another 9.5 percent to $142.88 on Thursday morning, before rebounding 1.6 percent to $144.52 in early Friday trading.Trump said Apple’s stock price has gone up “hundreds of percent” since he’s been president, but added that he wants the company to make its iPhone and other products in the US. “Don’t forget this: Apple makes their product in China,” Trump said. “I told Tim Cook, who’s a friend of mine who I like a lot, ‘Make your product in the United States. Build those big, beautiful plants that go on for miles, it seems. Build those plants in the United States.’…China is the biggest beneficiary of Apple, more than us, because they build their product mostly in China.”Neither Apple nor the White House immediately responded to requests for comment. Comments reading • Trump says Apple will be ‘fine,’ should still move iPhone production to US See it $999 Best Buy $999 • See It See It Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Preview • iPhone XS is the new $1,000 iPhone X Boost Mobile Apple iPhone XS Review • iPhone XS review, updated: A few luxury upgrades over the XR 9 Phones Politics Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Mentioned Above Apple iPhone XS (64GB, space gray) See All Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 Sprint Share your voice Apple Sep 1 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors $999 See It CNET may get a commission from retail offers. $999 Tags Applelast_img read more

Why Does Texas Have So Many Counties A History Lesson

first_imgU.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-El Paso, made news this summer for achieving a long-held goal in his campaign for U.S. Senate — visiting all of Texas’ 254 counties.That’s a lot of travel time, and the news made us — and our readers — wonder why Texas has so many counties. Texas is the second-largest state in both area and population, but it has 95 more counties than any other state.Georgia, with 159, has the second most. Delaware, with three, has the fewest. California, which has the largest population, has just 58 counties.So why does Texas have so many?Basically, Texas is big, and the state’s founders wanted to keep its local governments small. In the state’s early days — Texas became a state in 1845 — Texans needed to be close to those local governments, which were responsible for courts, jails, schools and roads, said lawyer David Brooks, who specializes in Texas county government.Brooks said counties needed to be small enough that residents could travel to and from their courthouse in a day on horseback to do business. Most farmers couldn’t afford to take more than one day off to travel to the county seat.As the state expanded throughout the years and the population increased, the number of counties did, too. The earliest counties in Texas history were called municipios and date back to Spanish rule, according to the Texas Association of Counties. There were 23 municipios in what’s now the southeastern part of the state.Texas became independent in 1836, and the municipios became counties. As settlers moved west, Texas added 14 new counties in under 10 years. When Texas joined the United States, the number of counties went from 37 to 67.When Texas sold land to the United States as part of the Compromise of 1850, another nine counties were added. By 1860, there were 152 counties in the state.Growth slowed during the Civil War and picked up again after Reconstruction, according to Kathryn Siefker, curator at the Bullock Texas State History Museum.The Constitution of 1876, which is what much of Texas state law today is based on, set requirements for Texas counties. New counties had to be at least 900 square miles and, whenever possible, laid out like a grid.Land known as the Young Territory in the Panhandle plains was split into 54 counties that year, which is why northwest Texas counties are squares and rectangles. The borders of older counties in the southern part of the state follow natural boundaries such as water basins, Brooks said.During the end of the 19th century, Texas’ larger counties in the western part of the state were split into smaller units as the population grew.“They found it would be better to go smaller or increase the amount of counties,” Siefker said.The state’s last county, Loving County, was added in 1931.The bottom line:  Texas has 254 counties because it’s so big — with about 28 million people and over 268,00 square miles, it’s the second largest state in both population and area. Texans followed a guideline that no one should be more than a day’s travel from their courthouse, keeping the counties relatively small.Disclosure: The Texas Association of Counties and the Bullock Texas State History Museum have been financial supporters of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune’s journalism. Find a complete list of them here. Sharelast_img read more

Mother of Trayvon Martin Announces Run for Local Office

first_imgBy ELLIS RUA Associated PressMIAMI GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — The mother of the unarmed Black teen who was shot dead by a neighborhood watch volunteer in Florida in 2012 has formally announced her candidacy to run for local office.Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, spoke to supporters Monday at a small event space tucked away inside of a Miami Gardens shopping plaza. She announced her plans to challenge Miami Gardens Mayor Oliver Gilbert for a Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners seat that is up for grabs in 2020 because of term limits.In this April 3, 2019 photo, Sybrina Fulton participates in a panel at the National Action Network Convention in New York. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)With her 28-year-old son, Jahvaris Fulton, and several other family members and friends at her side, Fulton stood at the podium in front of an audience of locals and pleaded her case.Fulton, a self-described political outsider who is from the district, said she has been mulling a run for office for about a year. She said she had never intended to get involved in politics, and that the political world left “a sour taste” in her mouth.She added that if it was not for her son’s killing, she would have been “going on vacations every year” and planning to retire.But after being thrust into the national spotlight after her son’s death, she slowly began to realize that she “needed to become a part of the change.”Fulton, who worked as a county employee for 24 years, became a full-time activist, making appearances on national television, campaigning for Hillary Clinton during the 2016 presidential election and starting a South Florida-based organization that aims to end “senseless gun violence.”“When my son got shot down, I stood up,” said Fulton. “And I’m still standing,” she added, provoking several cheers of “Amen” from audience members.In addition to tackling gun violence, Fulton said she plans on combating growing crime in the district. She’s also concerned with issues pertaining to housing access, mental illness and the elderly.“I’m bringing fresh new energy to problems that we’ve seen for a long time,” she said.Martin’s death sparked national outrage and was the catalyst for the Black Lives Matter movement, fueling the ongoing national conversation on systemic racism.His killer, George Zimmerman, was acquitted on the grounds of Florida’s controversial Stand Your Ground law.News of Zimmerman’s acquittal outraged many and led to protests across the United States.Milton Felton sat in the crowd Monday, wearing an oversized red button barring Fulton’s name pinned to his chest. He said her ties to the community and her work following her son’s death make her a worthy candidate. The 65-year-old property inspector added that he’s in favor of an outsider entering the realm of local politics.“Fresh air is always a good change of wind,” said Milton.Lesley McSpadden, the mother of Michael Brown, a Black 18-year-old who was fatally shot by a White police officer in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014, was defeated in April after running for a seat on her local city council. Brown’s death, like Trayvon Martin’s, caused large-scale civil unrest and added to the rise of the Black Lives Matter movement.Lucy McBath, a Democrat and an African American whose 17-year-old son was fatally shot in 2012 by a White man during an argument over loud music outside a Florida convenience store, last year won a suburban Atlanta congressional seat that was previously held by a Republican.She became a gun control activist after her son was killed, and she campaigned on that issue.last_img read more