Illovo Sugar Limited 2012 Abridged Report

first_imgIllovo Sugar Limited (ILLOVO.mw) listed on the Malawi Stock Exchange under the Food sector has released it’s 2012 abridged results.For more information about Illovo Sugar Limited (ILLOVO.mw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Illovo Sugar Limited (ILLOVO.mw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Illovo Sugar Limited (ILLOVO.mw)  2012 abridged results.Company ProfileIllovo Sugar Limited is a South African-based enterprise and Africa’s largest producer of raw sugar and sugar brands produced from sugar cane grown by its own agricultural operations and independent growers. It operates in six African countries and exports products to sub-Saharan Africa, the European Union and the United States. Illovo Sugar Malawi is based in Limbe in the Blantyre District. Illovo Sugar Limited operates in four segments; cane growing, sugar production, downstream and co-generation products. The Cane Growing division grows sugar cane which is used in the production of sugar productions. The Sugar Production division manufactures and markets Illovo Sugar brands. The Downstream and Co-generation division manufactures and markets brands that are by-products of the production process, including furfural and alcohol. Illovo Sugar Limited also supplies surplus electricity generated in the sugar production process. Illovo Sugar Limited is a subsidiary of Associated British Foods plc. Illovo Sugar Limited is listed on the Malawi Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Equity Bank Group Limited (EQTY.rw) Q12020 Presentation

first_imgEquity Bank Group Limited (EQTY.rw) listed on the Rwanda Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2020 presentation results for the first quarter.For more information about Equity Bank Group Limited (EQTY.rw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Equity Bank Group Limited (EQTY.rw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Equity Bank Group Limited (EQTY.rw)  2020 presentation results for the first quarter.Company ProfileEquity Bank Group Limited is a leading financial institution based in Kenya which offers products and services to private individuals and small-to-medium enterprises, and the corporate banking market. It operates in six geographical markets; Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan, Rwanda, Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The consumer division targets salaried customers or customers who receive regular remittances, such as a pension. The SME division provides financial solutions for working capital needs, property development and acquisition of assets. The corporate division targets large enterprises offering products and services that range from equity, mortgage and asset finance loans to trade finance, development loans and business loans. Formerly known as Equity Bank Limited, the commercial bank is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Equity Group Holdings Limited. Equity Bank Group Limited is listed on the Rwanda Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Indigenous people must stand against climate injustice

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Diana SwiftPosted Aug 20, 2015 Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald calls on Anglicans to be vigilant against climate injustice, saying “the poorest, those on the land, are suffering the most.” Photo: Anglican Video[Anglican Journal] The very essence of climate injustice—a better word than mere “change” to describe the environmental havoc wreaked by industrial society—is making those least responsible for it suffer most. That was a core message that Mark MacDonald, national Indigenous bishop of the Anglican Church of Canada, sent in his August 17 address on climate change to attendees at the eighth national Sacred Circle, being held in Port Elgin, Ont., August 16–22.“That’s what climate injustice is all about: those who created it are suffering least; the poorest, those on the land, are suffering the most,” he said.“The basic problem is that the colonial powers began a process of taking away our land, and that process continues today,” he added, with Indigenous people currently being drawn away from their ancestral territories at a faster pace than ever before. “It is different now, but it is still a powerful thing.” Unlike the naked land theft of the early European colonizers, those in power today do it economically and technologically, MacDonald said. “They give with one hand and take away with two.”More than any other region on the planet, the Arctic is being impacted by these trends, he said. Disturbingly, many people tend to see the North as a vast uninhabited expanse devoid of inhabitants, he said. “The same culture of invisibility that made Indigenous people invisible to settlers is making the Indigenous people living on the land invisible today.”And with Russia, Canada and the U.S. all staking disputed claims to the Arctic, matters will only get worse, he said. “It is essential that we stand up for our rights and say what is really happening in that region.”The bishop also recounted a tour around an Athabascan community in Alaska with Elder Sidney Huntington, who had built six community structures when only one was needed. When MacDonald asked him why, he replied that he had built them for posterity, for the time when all the cranes and engines of industrial development have disappeared. “All of this stuff is going away, and the young people will need to know how to survive,” Huntington said.It is crucial to keep the elders talking about the traditional values associated with the land, MacDonald said, noting that often elders will see things coming up on the horizon that should be faced today. Ban Ki-moon, United Nations secretary-general, he added, has stressed the critical importance of Indigenous people and their values to the future of the planet. MacDonald also noted that not since the fateful asteroid strike of 65 million years ago are so many of God’s creatures passing so quickly from existence. “It’s amazing to me that people can watch this sort of death and not feel something is wrong.”MacDonald said that many people across Turtle Island (North America) rejoice at the signs of progress since the end of the residential schools, “but we have to understand that for many people, particularly the poor, things are getting worse.”Turning to Indigenous people in the Bible, a topic he’s often asked about, MacDonald said that in scripture “when someone wants to get back to God, they become Indigenous. John the Baptist dressed in camel hair and ate locusts.” And when the prophets Elijah, Elisha and Jeremiah wished to find peace with God and call the nations back to righteousness, they, too, returned to Indigenous ways.The forces of power, money and greed are still destroying children, just as King Herod did in the Bible, and a stand must be taken against them, he said. MacDonald quoted Paul (Ephesians 6:10): “Put on the full armour of God, so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”He called on Indigenous peoples to return to “the way of life that God has given us, a spiritual return, a way we are called to by our elders…who have been talking about this for a long time.”Above all, he urged vigilance about climate injustice in the face of escalating economic development that threatens to destroy the land on which Indigenous people depend for life. “What would a people’s movement against this look like? It would look a lot like you,” he concluded. Rector Shreveport, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AliceMarie Slaven-Emond, RN, MS, FNP-C says: August 21, 2015 at 9:22 pm Bishop AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Jim Cutshall says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Indigenous people must stand against climate injustice TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Comments (4) Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN August 20, 2015 at 6:50 pm Thank you, Bishop Mark, for your prophetic, wise, and inspiring leadership. Your words ring true. Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Single-Family Rental Investment Amid COVID-19

first_img in Daily Dose, Featured, Media, News, Webcasts Home / Daily Dose / Single-Family Rental Investment Amid COVID-19 The latest episode of DS5: Inside the Industry features an interview with Stephanie Casper, VP of Sales for LendingHome.Casper discusses how the real estate industry is progressing when it comes to adopting and adapting to technology–something that is essential to most industries during this pandemic and beyond–and about the state of the single-family rental lending.You can watch the video at the embed below or at the following link. Tagged with: DS5 Single-Family Rental Investment Amid COVID-19 Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago  Print This Post Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Share Save Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago August 28, 2020 1,413 Views DS5 2020-08-28 Christina Hughes Babbcenter_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago About Author: Christina Hughes Babb Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Previous: The Latest in Mortgage Forbearance Data Next: The Week Ahead: Update on Unemployment Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Subscribelast_img read more

10 Important Factors An E-Commerce Entity Must Know To Deal With The Consumers In 2020

first_imgColumns10 Important Factors An E-Commerce Entity Must Know To Deal With The Consumers In 2020 Rakhi Banerjee7 Jan 2021 9:22 PMShare This – xAs per ministry of communication, Govt. of India, the number of internet users in India is expected to grow to 730 million by the year 2020. Due to adoption of digital technology, on the one hand E-commerce entity, where transactions occur directly with the consumers (B2C), multiplied rapidly and at the same time internet using consumers have grown fast in the past few years…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginAs per ministry of communication, Govt. of India, the number of internet users in India is expected to grow to 730 million by the year 2020. Due to adoption of digital technology, on the one hand E-commerce entity, where transactions occur directly with the consumers (B2C), multiplied rapidly and at the same time internet using consumers have grown fast in the past few years in India. Keeping in view the new set of challenges faced by consumers in the digital age, Consumer Protection Act, 2019 was passed by Govt. of India, which came into force with effect from 20th July, 2020 and Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020 was notified in the Gazette of India on 23rd July, 2020. The new act has come to replace the three decade old Consumer Protection Act, 1986. Who are the Consumers under the Consumer Protection Act, 2019? A consumer is who buys any goods or hires any service by paying price to the seller by offline or online transactions through electronic means or by teleshopping or direct selling or multi-level marketing. Such goods and services bought or hired should be for his own use or for earning his livelihood and not for any commercial purpose. Consumer Protection Act, 2019, applies to which goods and services? The new Act applies to all goods and services including all goods and services, bought or sold over digital or electronic networks including digital products. Rendering of any service free of charge or under a ‘contract of personal service’ (service rendered by an employee to his employer) is not a ‘service’ under the Act. Who is an E-commerce entity under Consumer Protection Act, 2019 & Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020? “E-commerce” is the business of buying or selling of goods or services including digital products over ditital or electronic networks. An “E-commerce entity” means who owns, operates or manages digital or electronic facility or platform for electronic commerce where buying or selling of goods or services including digital products takes place over digital or electronic network. An e-commerce entity should be a company incorporated under: i) the Companies Act, 1956 or the Companies Act, 2013 or ii) a foreign company covered under Companies Act, 2013 or iii) an office, branch or agency outside India owned or controlled by a person resident in India as provided in Foreign Exchange Management Act, 1999. E-commerce entities where Consumer Protection Act, 2019 & Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020 applies:- Marketplace e-commerce entity which provides an information technology platform (includes any website or mobile application) on a digital or electronic network to facilitate transactions between buyers and sellers. Inventory e-commerce entity which owns the inventory of goods or services and sells such goods or services directly to the consumers and shall include single branch retailers and multi-channel single brand retailers. E-commerce retails including multi-channel single brand retailers and single brand retailers in single or multiple formats E-commerce entity established outside India, but systematically offers goods or services to consumers in India. Do’s and Don’ts for an E-commerce entity in the light of Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020 :- Every e-commerce entity on its platform should : (1) clearly display for its users the– name of the E-commerce entity, address (headquarters and all branches),website; and contact details like email address, fax, landline and mobile numbers of customer care as well as the name of the grievance officer. (2) establish a grievance redressal mechanism where a grievance officer needs to be appointed, whose name, contact details, and designation should be displayed on its platform. (3) ensure that the grievance officer acknowledges the receipt of any consumer complaqint within 48 hours and redress the complaint within within one month from the date of receipt of the complaint. (4) mention on its platform the name and details of the importer (in case it offers imported goods and services for sale), from whom it has purchased such goods or services, or the details of the seller who imports such goods and services and sells it. (5) record consent of the consumer for the purchase of any goods or services offered on its platform, by explicit and affirmative action of the consumer and not in an automated way or by pre-ticked checkboxes. (6) made refund to the consumers as per guidelines of Reserve Bank of India or as per applicable laws where refund requests of the consumers are accepted by it. (7) not manipulate the price of the goods or services offered on its platform to impose unjustified price on consumers, (8) not discriminate between consumers of the same class or make any classification of consumers. (9) not impose any cancellation charges on consumers unless similar charges are also borne by the e-commerce entity for such cancellation of the purchase by the consumer. (10) not adopt any unfair trade practice in any manner. Do’s and Don’ts of a Marketplace E-Commerce Entity & Inventory E-Commerce Entity: Do’s and Don’ts of Marketplace E-Commerce Entity Do’s and Don’ts of Inventory E-Commerce Entity To ensure that the details of goods and services on their platform is accurate as regards its appearance, nature, quality, purpose or any other feature, by obtaining an undertaking in this regard from seller. To display information clearly on its platform for its users related to return, refund, exchange, warranty, guarantee, delivery, shipment including cost of return or shipping, mode of payments and its grievance redressal mechanism to enable the consumers to make informed decisions about their purchase of goods and services. To display all information clearly related to seller-their business, address, customer care no. rating or feedback etc for enabling consumer to make informed decision for purchase of goods and services. To display clearly total price of any good or service in single figure along with the breakup showing all charges, such as delivery charges, postage and handling charges, conveyance charges and the applicable tax. To provide a ticket number for each complaint to the consumers for the purpose of tracking complaint status by consumers. To provide a ticket number for each complaint to the consumers for the purpose of tracking complaint status by consumers. To provide all information related to refund, exchange, warranty, guarantee, delivery, shipment, modes of payment and grievance redressal mechanism to enable the consumer to make informed decision. To ensure that the advertisements for marketing of goods or services are consistent with the actual goods or services. To provide information on its platform on available payment methods including security and charges of such payment method. Procedure to cancellation of such payments under those methods, charge-back options, if any, and the contact details of the payment service provider. To provide information on its platform on available payment methods including security and charges of such payment method. Procedure to cancellation of such payments under those methods, charge-back options, if any, and the contact details of the payment service provider. To provide all information as are provided to it by seller and to disclose its relationship with sellers in its terms and conditions of business. To display and disclose all mandatory notices and contractual information required by applicable laws. To explain the parameters for determining ranking of goods or sellers on its platform through publicly available descriptions drafted in plain language. To bear the liability in any action related to the authenticity of goods or services sold by it, where it guarantees that such goods or services are authentic. Not to represent itself falsely as a consumer and post reviews about goods and services or misrepresent the quality or the features of any goods or services. Not to represent itself falsely as a consumer and post reviews about goods and services or misrepresent the quality or the features of any goods or services. Not to conspire or abet or aid in the commission of any unlawful act using any third party information hosted by it and also remove or disable access to material in its computer resource used to commit any unlawful act on that resource, without vitiating the evidence in any manner. Not to refuse to take back goods, or withdraw or discontinue services or refuse to refund consideration if such goods or services are defective, deficient, spurious, or not as advertised or agreed to or delivered late (unless due to force majeure). Duties of sellers on a marketplace e–commerce entity:- i) To execute a prior written contract with the respective e-commerce entity for offering and selling of goods or services. ii) To appoint a grievance officer who redresses the complaint within one month from the date of receipt of the complaint. iii) To ensure that the goods or services are consistent with the advertisements made in this regard. iv) To provide to the respective e-commerce entity, for displaying on the respective platform, its legal name, address, name and details of its website, e-mail address, customer care contact details, its GSTIN and PAN details and all contractual information as per law. v) To provide for displaying on the respective platform, the total price in single fiture of any good or service, along with the breakup price, showing all the compulsory and voluntary charges such as delivery charges, postage and handling charges, conveyance charges and the applicable tax, as per law. vi) To provide for displaying on the E-commerce platform, all mandatory notices and information provided by applicable laws and the expiry date of the good being offered for sale. vii) To provide for displaying on the platform, all relevant details about the goods and services offered for sale by the seller including country of origin, the name and contract numbers, and designation of the grievance officer, name and details of importer, and guarantees related to the authenticity or genuineness of the imported products. viii)To provide to the respective e-commerce entity all accurate information related to terms of exchange, returns and refund including information related to costs of return shipping in a clear and accessible manner, relevant details related to delivery and shipment of such goods or services; and any relevant guarantees or warranties applicable to such goods or services. ix) Not to adopt any unfair trade practice. x) Not to falsely represent itself as a consumer and post reviews about goods or services. xi) Not to refuse to take back defective, deficient spurious goods, or withdraw or discontinue services or refuse to refund payment. Grounds on which a consumer complaint lies: A complaint against the trader or service provider can be filed by a consumer for getting any relief before District Commission or State Commission, as the case may be, complaining for: i) supply of defective or faulty goods, ii) deficiency of services for charging excess price or offering goods or services which are hazardous and injurious to life and safety of the public or any act of negligence or omission or commission including deliberate withholding of relevant information which causes loss or injury to the consumer. iii) executing an unfair contract between a manufacturer or trader or service provider on one hand, and a consumer on the other requiring excessive security deposits from a consumer or imposing any disproportionate penalty or unreasonable charge, obligation or condition on the consumer. Refusing to accept early repayment of debts or unilaterally termination of contract or assigning the contract to the detriment of a consumer, without his consent also attribute to an unfair contract. iv) adopting unfair trade practice or deceptive practice including making false statement about the goods or services. Unfair and deceptive trade practice also includes not issuing bill or cash memo or receipt for the goods sold or services provided. Refusing to take back defective goods or withdraw deficient services and refusing to refund the payment within stipulated time are some of the offence under unfair trade practice. Consumer Protection Act, 2019 provides that disclosure of any personal information by the seller or service provider to other person, given in confidence by the consumer (unless such disclosure is made in accordance with the provisions of any law for the time being in force) is an offence under unfair trade practice. v) any defective product manufactured or sold or for deficiency in services relating thereto, a claim for product liability action lies against the product manufacturer, product seller or produce service provider who are liable to compensate for any harm caused to a consumer including damage to any property, personal injury, illness or death. Personal injury and harm also includes mental agony or emotional distress or any loss of consortium or other loss. What is Central Consumer Protection Authority (CCPA): The Consumer Protection Act, 2019 has a provision to establish a Central Consumer Protection Authority (CCPA) to regulate matters relating to violation of rights of consumers, unfair trade practices and false or misleading advertisements. A complaint in this regard may be forwarded to CCPA who shall have an Investigation Wing, and after investigation it can pass direction for recalling of goods or withdrawal of services which are dangerous, hazardous or unsafe. It can also pass direction for reimbursement of the prices of goods or services and discontinuation of unfair practices. In case of misleading advertisement CCPA may issue directions to the concerned trader or manufacturer or endorser or advertiser or publisher, as the case may be, to discontinue or to modify such advertisement. It may also impose a penalty up to Rs 10 lakh on the said endorser in the first instance and Rs 50 lakh for every subsequent contravention. Penalty and Punishment for offences under Consumer Protection Act, 2019 and for contravention of Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020: i) For non compliance of directions of Central Consumer Protection Authority (CCPA) by any person shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to six months or with fine which may extent to twenty lakh rupees, or with both. It is a compoundable offence under the act. ii) Any manufacturer or service provider who causes false or misleading advertisement shall be punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to two years and with fine which may extend to ten lakh rupees and for every subsequent offence, be five years and with fine which may extend to fifty lakh rupees. It punished with imprisonment for a term which may extend to is a compoundable offence under the act. iii) For manufacturing products containing adulterant for the purpose of selling, storing or distributing or importing, depending on the magnitude of injury caused to the consumer, the act lays down maximum punishment for such offence is imprisonment for life and with fine which shall not be less than ten lakh rupees. iv) For manufacturing for sale or for storing or selling or distributing of importing spurious goods by any person, depending on the magnitude of injury to the causes to the consumer, the act lays down maximum punishment for such offence is imprisonment for a term which shall not be less than seven years, but may extend to imprisonment for life and with fine which shall not be less than ten lakh rupees. Author’s Analysis E-commerce business has been flourishing in India rapidly. Consumer confidence is the most important factor for growth of a business where transactions are from business-to-consumer. When consumers have a low confidence, businesses can’t grow or earn revenue due to less spending by the consumers, which ultimately leads to downfall of overall economic activity. Consumers spend more when they get confidence in the business transaction in the market which leads to growth of business and economic prosperity. Consumer Protection Act, 2019 and Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020 are in conformity with the principles for ‘good business practices’ as enumerated in United Nations Guidelines for Consumer Protection-2016. Accordingly the provisions of the Act and the Rules for E-commerce business as summarised in this article are based on the principles of fair and equitable treatment, commercial behaviour, disclosure and transparency, protection of privacy of consumers and effective complaints-handling mechanisms of business entities. It is quite evident from the past enactments of several laws in Indian legal system that poor implementation of any Act and relevant Rules make even the greatest law ineffective. The effective implementation of the Consumer Protection Act and E-Commerce Rules will not be possible until or unless government take initiative for providing basic minimum infrastructure and resources for administration of justice by Consumer Commissions at different level. Due to new set of pecuniary jurisdiction as provided in the Act practical difficulty may be faced by the consumers in implementing the beneficial legislation in their favour. As per new Act, District Commission will entertain a complaint where value of the goods or services paid as consideration does not exceed Rs.1 Crore. It is obvious that maximum cases would fall under the pecuniary jurisdiction of District Commissions under various State Governments and District Commissions will be burdened with maximum cases to be filed before it. In the present scenario, District Commissions have neither infrastructure nor man power to deal with so many cases which was earlier divided between District Forum, State Commissions and National Commission as per their respective pecuniary jurisdiction. Consequently consumers may not get relief easily due to delay and lack of infrastructure to deal with so many cases which need to be addressed on an urgent basis to strengthen the effective implementation of Consumer Protection Act, 2019 and Consumer Protection (E-Commerce) Rules, 2020. Views are personal.(Author is a practicing Lawyer at Delhi) References:- https://consumeraffairs.nic.in/sites/default/files/CP Act 2019.pdfhttps://consumeraffairs.nic.in/sites/default/files/E commerce rules.pdf. https://unctad.org/system/files/official-document/ditccplpmisc2016d1_en.pdf Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. 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‘Grand ol’ lady’ stirs memories of happier times

first_img Sponsored Content By The Penny Hoarder Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… ‘Grand ol’ lady’ stirs memories of happier times “But they still consider themselves graduates of the old Barbour County High School,” Goodson said. “The covered dish luncheon is an annual event and anyone who attended the old Barbour County High School is invited.”The “Grand Ol’ Lady” is now the George C. Wallace Heritage Building and it has been beautifully restored. The building features an auditorium with original seating on the main floor and in the balcony, the Dr. Stroud Jackson room, the Veterans’ Hall of Honor, a kitchen and dining room.“We are extremely proud of our heritage building and enjoy having events here, especially our covered dish lunches where we all get together to remember the good ol’ days at Barbour County High School,” Goodson said. Troy Exchange Club presents A.C.E. Award The Troy Exchange Club honored Chenzira Flowers of Pike County High School with the club’s 10th Annual A.C.E. Award (Accepting… read more Email the author Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson You Might Like Published 3:00 am Wednesday, May 10, 2017 A group of graduates of the old Barbour County High School in Clio stayed around to visit a little longer after the annual covered dish luncheon at the historic high school on Saturday. All those who attended the historic high school are invited back each year to remember the ‘good ol’ days.’ The building is now the George C. Wallace Heritage Building. The luncheon was hosted by the George C. Wallace Heritage Association.For those who graduated from or just attended the old Barbour County High School in Clio, simply walking through the doors of the “Grand Ol’ Lady” transports their minds to “happy times.”Such as it was Saturday when the George C. Wallace Heritage Association hosted a covered dish luncheon for all those who attended the historic high school.Anita Goodson, association member, said the old Barbour County High School closed its doors in December 1961 and the graduating seniors graduated from the new Barbour County High School in Clayton.center_img Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Skip Saturday’s event was much like all of the other school “reunions.” Several graduates or attendees spoke from the stage. Special music by Keisha Whitman, who was accompanied on the guitar by her husband, Mike, and by pianist and vocalist Danny Barefoot, brought back memories of songs sung at morning devotionals and music for dancing at Friday night sock hops.Lomax Robinette took schoolmates on a memory walk down the streets of, what was then, a bustling Clio. He reminded them of a gentleman who walked the streets of town, going from one store to the other in hopes of finding inquisitive fellowship. At long last, he found an audience and finally someone asked what he was wanting to hear, “Heard you had a wedding…” to which he replied, “Yeah, and I told her you can always come back home.”“And, we can always come back home to the old Barbour County High School,” Robinette said, to a round of applause.Dr. Joe Kicklighter, a professor at Auburn University, came “home” to Clio to pay tribute to his aunt Josephine Baxter who “took in” his brother and him when he was only eight years old. Book Nook to reopen Baxter was a teacher at Barbour County and she motivated and inspirited him to greater heights than he thought possible, just as she did many other students.“I was living in Clio during the 1950s, which I consider Clio’s heydays,” Kicklighter said, remembering Doris Day movies, Wallace Tillman beverages, Joe Long’s insults, wonderful teachers like Lula Andrews and the town doctor, Stroud Jackson, and historian Alto Jackson and going “way off” shopping at Rosenberg’s in Troy.Kicklighter did not graduate from the old Barbour County High School, but the Clio experience was important to him.“I’ve been in Auburn for 42 years but it is a blessing for me to come home to Clio,” he said. “I cherish the time I spent here and I’m sure all of you cherish your times at old Barbour County High School.”The formal meeting closed with the challenge, “Let’s get loose like a goose and enjoy ourselves” and they did. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Jaine Treadwell Latest Stories Print Article Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. 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Bloomfield, NJ office complex sells for $52M

first_img Tags Message* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Brad Domenico of Progress Capital arranged a $40 million acquisition loan for the buyer, and Natixis Real Estate Capital was the lender.Progress Capital said the buyer was particularly attracted to the property’s location, which is just off the Garden State Parkway. The office park recently got several upgrades, including new parking lots, and has tenant amenities such as a lounge and fitness center.Like other regions, New Jersey’s office market has been severely affected by the pandemic. The availability rate in the first quarter climbed to 21.6 percent, up 4 percentage points compared to the same time last year, according to a report from Avison Young New Jersey.But office properties are still selling. Most recently, Mack-Cali Realty sold its Short Hills, New Jersey, office portfolio to the Birch Group for $255 million.Contact Akiko Matsuda Progress Capital partner Brad Domenico and Broadacres Office Park (Photos via Progress Capital)An office complex in Bloomfield, New Jersey, sold for $52 million in an off-market transaction.ERCT Capital Group, a real estate investment firm based in Montclair, New Jersey, bought the four-building campus from P3 Properties, who paid $31 million for the property in 2017, according to public records. ERCT Capital was not immediately available for comment.The Broadacres Office Park spans 398,000 square feet across three buildings at 200, 300 and 400 Broadacres Drive, and an additional one at 1455 Broad Street.Read moreMack-Cali sells Short Hills, NJ office portfolio for $255MDifferent state, same problem: Office availability soars in NJMack-Cali Realty sells Metropark complex for $254ME Full Name* Share via Shortlink Email Address* New Jerseyoffice markettri-state weeklylast_img read more

Wheat harvest holds up despite patchy summer

first_imgAn improved harvest means bakers will be using more home-grown wheat this year. With most of the bread wheat now harvested, there is industry-wide relief that crops have survived well despite the patchy summer weather.Total yield estimates range from 14.2m-15m tonnes, while protein levels are higher than those in last year’s bumper harvest, when diluted protein caused problems for millers.UK flour milling trade body Nabim labelled it “an average harvest”. Said director general Alex Waugh: “There will be a certain amount of variation but there’s a reasonable amount of wheat to choose from.”ADM Milling reported that early indications pointed to good, albeit variable quality, moving across the country. Trading director Lewis Wright said: “In terms of blending it is expected that there will be a greater use of UK-grown wheat and we will work with our customers’ requirements to manage price and offer best value.”Warburtons’ executive director Brett Warburton said the signs were good for the UK: “It’s too early too say what the impact will be on our bakeries but the early signs are positive from a quality perspective. In Canada, the late harvest leaves the crop exposed to possible frost damage, but it’s too early to call.”Rank Hovis would be importing less from Germany, said head of wheat procurement, Gary Sharkey, who admitted a sense of relief after last year. He added that while the wheat price had gone up by £5 a tonne to £128 in the last few days (after the market reacted to a perceived lack of yield following Defra’s revised final projection, down half a million tonnes to 14.2m tonnes) prices had dropped since the middle of May.Like many bakers, NAMB member Anthony Kindred of Kindred Bakery, who has one shop, hoped prices would still ease slightly, but added: “The worry for a baker is when there’s a shortage because of a bad crop you panic a bit if you can’t get good enough flour, but it sounds as though it will be okay this year.”last_img read more

Key bakery categories outperform total UK food exports

first_imgThree of the four key value-added segments in bakery exports outperformed the total food and non-alcoholic beverage export market, which grew by 2.5% to £6.1bn in the first half of 2013.According to the latest report from the Food & Drink Federation covering the first six months of the year, major export markets of sweet biscuits and bread saw strong growth, while savoury biscuits also lifted moderately.However, there was little movement in the second-largest bakery export category, cakes.The largest segment, sweet biscuits, saw gains of 14.2%, to be worth £136m. The biggest wins were in Australia (up 71.9% to £6m), Saudi Arabia (up 37% to £5m), the US (up 16.5% to £7m), France (up 3.1% to £11m) and Ireland (up 2.5% to £40m). Meanwhile, other markets saw promising double-digit growth of around 19%.Bread performed well overseas, rising 6.9% to £54m, with France continuing to buy more bread from the UK – a market that now imports £6m of bread products (up 17.5%).The biggest shift in bread was a 64.7% boost to the Netherlands (to £3m). However, exports of cake to the country dropped by nearly a quarter over the same period, denting total cake exports, which rose just 0.5% to £96m.In the savoury biscuits category, which saw growth of 2.4% to £17m, the US attracted the strongest uplift, at 23.7%, to be worth around £4m. Australia and the Netherlands are burgeoning markets, both rising nearly 42% to around £1m.UK exports to the Eurozone were more competitive in the first half of the year as sterling weakened from an average of €1.22 in 2012 to €1.18 in 2013, said the report.“[The exchange rate] is more favourable for us and it has been since the economic downturn because of the weakness of the pound. But it has not been the driving factor [behind the growth in bakery exports],” James Marquette, economics executive and export lead at the FDF, told British Baker.“More food and drink companies are waking up to exports – even businesses producing short shelf-life items in the bakery sector have started to realise there are opportunities to export to ‘local’ markets, such as Ireland, France and Germany. They realise they can get their products over there and that they will do well.”UK exports to markets using the US dollar became marginally more competitive in the first half as sterling weakened from $1.58 in 2012 to $1.54 in 2013, stated the FDF.last_img read more