Jamaican banker pleads guilty to US$220 million fraud

first_img Share NewsRegional Jamaican banker pleads guilty to US$220 million fraud by: – March 30, 2011 Sharing is caring! Share David Smith, former CEO of Olint Corp by Global News StaffORLANDO, USA –Jamaican banker David Smith, the former head of collapsed investment scheme Olint, has pleaded guilty in a Florida court to defrauding thousands of customers of more than US$220 million.The Jamaica Observer reported that, as part of a plea agreement, Smith has admitted guilt on four counts of wire fraud, one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering and ten counts of money laundering.He is facing up to 20 years imprisonment, but is likely to get less because of his plea bargaining.Last year, he received a prison sentence of just over six years in the Turks and Caicos Islands, where he pleaded guilty to fraud and conspiracy charges. US authorities collected him from the TCI in November to face federal charges.Prosecutors said that more than 6,000 people invested with Smith. He admitted in his plea agreement that Olint was a “massive” Ponzi scheme, where he paid returns to investors not from profit but from their own money or that paid by subsequent investors.In addition, funds transferred to his own personal bank accounts reportedly enabled Smith to live a lavish lifestyle. Among his expenditures included political contributions, gambling, a down-payment for the purchase of a Lear jet and sponsorship of the Jamaica Jazz and Blues Festival.A raid by authorities in Jamaica forced him to shut down his business in Kingston and relocate to the Turks and Caicos Islands, where former premier Michael Misick once described him as a “model citizen”.Source: Caribbean News Nowcenter_img Share Tweet 24 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

Cricket News Bangladesh Women’s Team India Staff Will Not Travel To Pakistan: Cricket Board

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: The Bangladesh women’s cricket team will be touring Pakistan for the first time since 2015 and this follows on the heels of the Sri Lanka men’s team currently touring the country for three ODIs and three Twenty20 Internationals. The women’s team will be playing three Twenty20 Internationals and two ODIs at the Gaddafi stadium in Lahore starting on October 4. However, the Bangladesh women cricket team’s Indian members of the coaching staff will not travel to the country amidst rising tensions between India and Pakistan.The tour is still subject to security checks by Bangladesh’s government before it can take place. The governing body’s chief executive Nizamuddin Chowdhury told AFP that if it goes ahead, head coach Anju Jain, assistant coach Devika Palshikar, and trainer Kavita Pandey will not accompany the side in Pakistan. But they will travel with the Bangladesh team when they play the ACC Emerging Women’s Asia Cup in Sri Lanka from October 20 to 28.  “We will have another team travelling to Sri Lanka almost at the same period. We’ve decided to send our Indian coaching staff to Sri Lanka instead of Pakistan to avoid any travel complications,” Nizamuddin said. “We have started the process. Before confirming the series we are also planning to send someone to see the security arrangement for the Sri Lanka team in their ongoing series.”Also Read | World Needs To Help Pakistan To Revive Cricket After Decade Of Terrorism: Misbah-ul-HaqThe ongoing series against Sri Lanka is the first for Pakistan under Misbah-ul-Haq, the new head coach and chief selector. Misbah captained Pakistan for close to six years and in 56 Tests but he never managed to do that at home in Pakistan. Misbah played just five Tests in Pakistan and ahead of the first match, he has urged the world to help Pakistan revive their international cricket.Also Read | Karachi Ends 10-Year Wait For International Cricket, But Pakistan vs Sri Lanka Game Rained Off”Cricket world need to do more, not only for Pakistan but for any country where it is hit. Pakistan is a cricket-loving country and it would be injustice to deprive them of international cricket, so I hope that the world will support us more and more. Otherwise the survival of cricket will be difficult,” Misbah said. last_img read more

Dale Earnhardt Jr. still has ‘the itch’ to race

first_imgThat competitiveness, though, is something he credits for making his job in the booth more fulfilling.”The way that I feel about (racing) and the way that I miss it is kind of healthy toward doing the job as a broadcaster,” Earnhardt said. “It makes me excited to go watch the race and excited about what I’m going to see.”The 44-year-old had his growing pains this year in the booth but was happy to learn from his mistakes and will work to get better.”The majority of the feedback that I got was positive, and that spurred me on just to keep digging and keep working and keep doing what I was doing,” he said. “Hopefully that will be enough to keep me around for a while.” Dale Earnhardt Jr. may have retired from full-time NASCAR racing, but that doesn’t mean he never wants to race again.”I have this itch or an urge to go race or run a race or just drive a car somewhere,” Earnhardt said Thursday, via ESPN. “But I don’t have a clear regret or a real urge that’s got to be satisfied.” Earnhardt spent almost the entirety of the season in the broadcast booth with NBC in 2018, but he did find his way onto the track once for an Xfinity race in Richmond.He finished fourth there and looked every bit of the competitor he always has been — he just didn’t quite have the car to come away with a win. Related News Dale Earnhardt Jr. wants to race again in 2019 after finishing 4th in Richmond While Earnhardt has not indicated he wants to get back to racing full time, he would like to get in a car again. Immediately after finishing his Xfinity race in Richmond this year he said just that.”We’ll try to do another one next year, we’ll see where we go,” he said. “We’ll be with Hellmann’s again, and we have to figure out what race that’s going to be.”last_img read more