Quiz show captain rusticated

first_imgTHE CAPTAIN of Magdalen’s University Challenge team has been rusticated for a year due to poor academic performance.Second year history student Jon Wright hopes to continue as captain despite being sent down, but has yet to hear from College authorities whether he will be allowed to continue in the role.Wright said he would oppose any College attempts to remove him from the team. “I haven’t heard anything at all from College: this is only rustication, I’m still a student. We don’t really have anyone who could take my place on the team, so if College do have a problem with me carrying on I’ll be vigorously opposing that,” he said. Magdalen have already won through the first round, beating Liverpool 185 to 100, and have filmed their next match against Birmingham, but due to contractual agreements Wright was unable to reveal the result as the programme has not yet aired. Magdalen have previously won the competition three times before in 1997, 1998 and 2004.He was “quietly confident” that the team had a good chance of doing well in the competition, but stopped short of predicting victory. “We don’t expect to win, but given the right opponents and right questions we could have a chance of winning,” he said. Magdalen’s Junior Dean, Dr Robert Douglas-Fairhurst, refused to comment on whether Wright would be allowed to continue as University Challenge captain, saying he would have to wait until the matter was dealt with internally.”As its in an internal disciplinary matter we can’t make any comment. Jon is of course allowed to think what he wants, but we won’t make any comment until it has been dealt with by the College authorities. It’s the sort of thing we would have to discuss internally and with Jon before we make anything public,” he said.According to Wright, he was rusticated for a year by the College due to poor academic work. “It was purely for academic reasons, just because I didn’t work hard enough, so they suggested I take a year off and regain my focus which I am now doing. I hope to get a job to give myself some structure and then work towards my penal collections at the end of Trinity Term.”last_img read more

Roberts Bakery cycles for charity

first_imgStaff from Roberts Bakery have raised £15,000 for a breast cancer charity by completing a two-day cycling challenge.Employees from the Cheshire bakery firm cycled from the company’s headquarters in Northwich to Snowdon, followed by a steep climb to the top of Mount Snowdon, to help raise funds for Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention. The money the company has raised for the charity, which currently totals £38,000, will contribute to the groundbreaking PROCAS study, which aims to predict which women are most susceptible to breast cancer.Genesis Breast Cancer Prevention, based in Wythenshawe Hospital, has supported Roberts’ family member Lindsay Occleston Roberts, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009.She said: “This is a truly pioneering study. I sincerely hope it will reveal why some women get breast cancer and that it will ultimately help us to prevent this awful disease in the future.”last_img read more

Senate discusses Honor Code, committee projects

first_imgThe student senate, led by Sophomore Class Council president Sam Cannova and Junior Class Council president Laksumi Sivanandan, convened for their weekly meeting Monday to discuss the Student Safety Summit and the University Honor Code, among other topics.The first item of business was a briefing from sophomore senator Jack Usher of St. Edward’s Hall and sophomore senator Weston Dell of Carroll Hall about the Student Safety Summit, which will take place Oct. 9 in the LaFortune Ballroom. “We are partnering with NDSP and local police forces around the area, the South Bend Police Force and the Mishawaka Police Force, to bring police figures and safety figures [from] around the area to talk about safety issues on campus,” Dell said. “We are hosting this discussion time for students to ask questions of these higher-up officials, and just try to get some answers, maybe try and make some ground on working towards solutions on these problems.”Senior and student body president Gates McGavick and senior chief of staff Briana Tucker also facilitated a discussion of changes to the University Honor Code.“Dean Hugh Page, the Dean of the First Year of Studies, has started the process that began this year to update the Honor Code with the general intention of making it more of a document you can interact with over the course of your four years here,” McGavick said.The main changes being discussed are standardizing the Honor Code across all classes, instituting a mandatory waiting period of several days before students accused of violating the Honor Code can be disciplined and finding a way to develop a distinction between cheating and collaborating.“[Page] wants to make sure that kids feel comfortable helping each other but not cheating, finding the line between being there for your fellow classmates and friends, not cheating but not being scared to help someone with their homework for fear of violating the Honor Code,” McGavick said.Tucker said the administration is hoping to implement these changes as soon as next semester.Teach for America’s on-campus ambassador, senior Jamie Campbell, presented to the senators about opportunities within the organization. Campbell asked each person at the meeting to think of their favorite teacher before explaining the organization’s purpose.“What most people say when they think of this teacher is not, ‘Oh, they had a great lesson plan. I really thought that they were so good at explaining this one concept,’” Campbell said. “It’s just normally that they are people that care about you and that value you, and that is the kind of teacher that we believe all kids across America deserve to have.”Teach for America participants teach in an underprivileged school for two years. Campbell said Teach for America seeks college students with strong leadership skills who want to continue developing these skills in service.She said the next online application deadline for Teach for America is Oct. 17. The four senate committees met in their smaller groups to discuss project ideas for their committees.The Residence Life committee chairman, junior senator Zachary Spitzer of Dunne Hall, said the committee plans to request information on the dorm renovation schedule and investigating the University’s housing waiver policy.Sophomore senator Megan Metersky of Flaherty Hall, filling in as the chairperson of the Sustainability Committee, said some of the group’s concerns include the community garden that was discarded last year and the fact that Grotto candles cannot be recycled if there is still wax inside of them. Metersky also said the committee wants to learn more about the green roofing on top of the Joyce Center and Duncan Student Center.The chairwoman of the Student Safety and Wellness Committee, Cavanaugh Hall’s sophomore senator Bailey Baumbick, said the committee hopes to take advantage of events such as the Student Safety Summit.“Our committee will definitely have a large presence at the Student Safety Summit,” Baumbick said. “We’re going to come prepared with some questions to ask all the police chiefs, and that will hopefully determine where we want to go in terms of our committee.”Sophomore senator Andrew Seketa of Zahm House, chairperson of the Student Finances committee, said the group aims to research student finances. Seketa said the committee hopes to send out surveys about what resources and topics students want to learn about, as well as provide students with information about Notre Dame’s financial aid. “We’d like to do some more individual research with the Office of Financial Aid, with respect to transparency with the statistics, average financial aid packages … student employment and average financial aid contribution,” Seketa said. “Once we have some findings there, we can apply some resolutions on how to re-evaluate a few ways to calculate these certain statistics and concepts as a whole.”Editor‘s note: A previous version of this article misspelled Briana Tucker‘s last name on second reference.Tags: committees, Honor Code, nd safety summit, ND student senate, teach for americalast_img read more

England can’t just rely on Archer to beat Aussies: Paul Collingwood

first_imgLondon: England assistant coach Paul Collingwood believes Joe Root and Co. should not put too much pressure on Jofra Archer and cannot afford to rely just on him in their bid to level the Ashes series against Australia in London.England were beaten comprehensively by 251 runs by Australia in the first Test at Edgbaston last week with Archer left out with a side injury.However, with James Anderson ruled out of the Lord’s Test, Archer is set to make his Test debut in the match starting Wednesday. “We can’t say ‘look Jofra, you are coming in to answer all the questions Australia are asking’,” BBC Sport quoted Collingwood as saying.“He is going to add what we have already,” Paul Collingwood said. “We have got a very good seam attack and he gives us different options. He does have the confidence and X-factor about him but I don’t want the team to rely on a young lad coming in and expecting him to beat the Aussies. It doesn’t work like that,” he added.Meanwhile, former England skipper Michael Vaughan said he expects Archer to “have an impact” at Lord’s if he is given his debut.Archer grabbed the attention of the larger global cricketing audience with his exploits in the Indian Premier League before storming into the international cricket scene with his stellar performance in England’s successful 2019 World Cup campaign. The Barbados-born fast bowler has 131 wickets in 28 First Class matches and scored over 1,000 runs in the longer formats.The 24-year-old, however, has said that his performance in the World Cup should not lead to unreasonable expectations. IANS Also Read: Paul Collingwood forced to take field as injury woes mount for EnglandAlso Watch: Assam Police Commandos launched major operation near Assam-Arunachal Pradesh Borderlast_img read more

Sakash: No sure things when it comes to bracketology

first_imgOn Sunday night after the last conference championship game is decided, printers will work overtime, pools will form, money will be exchanged and inevitably hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of people will fill out an NCAA Tournament bracket.Many will choose based on the empirical evidence gathered by watching hundreds of college basketball games, scrutinizing every pick to its core. Others will color inside the lines or hover as close to the chalk as possible. And of course, some (and mind you, this is usually the most successful group) will pick according to mascot partiality and/ or uniform color.There’s no one correct way to fill out a bracket because the NCAA Tournament is so unpredictable, which makes it as exciting as it has become over the last few decades.There are some statistics that may help with “bracketology,” however, especially for first round games when many brackets are substantiated or torn to shreds (literally). Feel free to use them even though; in the end, they’ll likely help very little.Picking No. 1 seeds are a given. In the history of the NCAA Tournament, no No. 16 seed has usurped No. 1 (that’s a 100 percent success rate if you’re scoring at home). Predicting the first ever No. 16 over No. 1 upset is throwing away points (but if you’re in my pool, you can be sure this IS the year it will actually happen; in fact all the No. 1 seeds might lose).No. 2 seeds are usually pretty straightforward, as well. They are 80-4 in first round games (since 1985, when the field expanded to 64 teams). The last time a No. 2 lost in the first round, however, was in 2001, when Hampton took out Iowa State (Marcus Fizer’s career rapidly declined since that day, and how the heck did Iowa State earn a No. 2 seed in the first place?).Three and four seeds are, for the most part, sure things. Lately, a few 13 and 14 seeds have snuck into the second round (Bucknell, Weber St. and Bradley come to mind), but even those upsets are pretty few and far between.Then there’s the pesky 5-12 matchup. Most serious bracketologists wouldn’t dare turn in their bracket without a No. 12 over No. 5 upset. The reasoning behind the strategy is sound, as every year since 1988, except one, a No. 12 seed has taken down a No. 5.Interestingly enough No. 6 seeds have a better record against No. 11 than No. 5 vs. 12. But even still, turning in a finished bracket without a No. 11 over a No. 6 is probably foolish.From there, 7-10 and 8-9 matchups are often tossups. I suggest the “Ask Your Grandmother” technique for these games. Grandmothers are perfect for this kind of thing. They usually know nothing about basketball, sports or really anything else besides baking brownies, knitting sweaters and smelling kind of weird, which makes them eminently qualified for the job at hand.Ask her which mascot sounds friendlier. Show her pictures of the head coaches, and ask her which man has a nicer face (they really like that kind of stuff; trust me). Do anything so that they are the one’s making the ultimate decision, not you.Finally, voila: The first round is complete.Now, there are some very difficult decisions to make in the second round. The first, however, happens to be the most exciting part of the process: picking the one or two Cinderella(s) in your bracket.Everyone loves to see a Cinderella go deep into the tournament. Even more people love to be the ones who knew it would happen the whole time (though they didn’t really know, they just used the Grandmother Technique and are taking the credit for themselves).If a No. 12 seed can take out No. 5, why can’t they do the same against a No. 4 and dance into the Sweet 16? A No. 11 over a No. 3, why not? Remember George Mason?The numbers get pretty crazy past the first round in terms of statistics (how often No. X moves on vs. No. Y because there are so many possible matchups). But the No. 1 seed (assuming they have moved on) will always have to play the winner of the 8-9 game, which can be a really tricky pick.The stats are in the No. 1 seed’s favor since their record against No. 8 or No. 9 seeds is 92-13 or about 85 percent all time.Though, don’t be so quick to assume No. 1 is a sure thing this year.ESPN’s resident bracketologist Joe Lunardi has Ohio State possibly matched up with Missouri (a team that was ranked as high as eighth in the polls this year) or Tennessee, (a team with wins over Pittsburgh and Villanova during the regular season) in the second round.Is it so far fetched that either of these teams could take down the Buckeyes? Heavens no! (Though if Ohio State continues to shoot the three as well as it has lately, maybe it’s an easier pick than it seems).In either case, past the second round, there are no sure things. There is no UNC with five NBA ready players to blaze through the tournament field. It’s wide open this year.Some will go through several brackets, rethinking upsets, overanalyzing the 2-15 games, pestering grandma to no end and still won’t be happy with their finished product.Others will go with their first instinct; fill out the bracket once, and leave it as is without worrying too much about it.But almost all will be wrong about almost everything.last_img read more